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Aga Khan

Negotiating the Racial Boundaries of Khōjā Caste Membership in Late Nineteenth-Century Colonial Zanzibar (1878–1899)

This article explores late nineteenth-century identity formation and caste boundaries among the Khōjā of colonial Zanzibar. The central concern regarding children born to a non-Khōjā parent was what status, particularly regarding rights of inheritance, the multiracial children born of these relationships had within the caste structure. The case of Nasur Jesa v. Hurbayee suggests that the attitude toward these children was inconsistent; sometimes they were embraced,and at other times they were shunned by the Khōjā community.

Negotiating the Racial Boundaries of Khōjā Caste Membership in Late Nineteenth-Century Colonial Zanzibar (1878–1899)

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2014
Date Published  2014
Authors  Akhtar, Iqbal
Original Publication  Journal of Africana Religions, Vol. 2, No. 3 (2014), pp. 297-316
Publisher  Penn State University Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/jafrireli.2.3.0297 .
Source  

Florida International University

Key Words  chotara; jotawa; Khōjā; Zanzibar; Ismaili; Ithnā ʿAsharī; Aga Khan; firman; jamat

Taqiyya and Identity in a South Asian Community

The Guptı¯s of Bhavnagar, India, represent an unexplored case of taqiyya, or precautionary dissimulation, and challenge traditional categories of religious identity in South Asia. Taqiyya is normally practiced by minority or otherwise
disadvantaged groups of Muslims who fear negative repercussions should their real faith become known. Historically, the Shı¯‘a, whether Ithna¯ -‘asharı¯ or Ismaili, have commonly dissimulated as Sunnı¯s, who form the dominant community.

English and the transnational Ismaili Muslim community: Identity, the Aga Khan, and infrastructure

The adoption of English as the official language of the transnational Ismaili Muslim community has its roots in the British Raj, which provides the backdrop for recent Ismaili history. Yet it is the Aga Khan IV, spiritual leader of the community since 1957, who has most avidly pushed English as part of a ‘language policy’.

English and the transnational Ismaili Muslim community: Identity, the Aga Khan, and infrastructure

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2016
Date Published  2016
Authors  Bolander, Brook
Original Publication  Language in Society 45(4), 583-604
Pagination  583-604
Source  

Room 735, 7/F, Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China

Key Words  Ismaili Muslim; English language; Aga Khan; and infrastructure

The Aga Khan’s Earthly Kingdom, Vanity Fair 2013-02-01

HORSING AROUND The Aga Khan’s private horse-training grounds near Chantilly, France. Right, Prince Karim Aga Khan, when he was a
Source: 
www.vanityfair.com/magazine/toc/contents-201302

Multi-billionaire son of a notorious playboy, His Highness Prince Karim, the fourth Aga Khan, enjoys his jets, yachts, and Thoroughbreds. But since the age of 20, he has also been the spiritual leader of 15 million Shia Ismaili Muslims, building a hugely effective global development network. In Chantilly, home to France’s most prestigious horse race, James Reginato explores how the press-shy, Harvard-educated prince, at 76, fuses two worlds.


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