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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word na'd means sound, voice or calling, and Na'de Ali means calling upon Ali. It is a sacred invocation uttered in the time of troubles and adversities. Imam Jafar Sadik said, "One who recites Na'de Ali with pure heart, his desires will be accomplished."

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #83

    Prophète. (Sans message écrit). V. Rasoul*.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word nabi is derived from naba, meaning an announcement of great utility imparting knowledge of a thing. One lexicologist explains the word nabi as meaning an ambassador between God and rational beings from among His creatures. According to another, a nabi is the man who gives information about God. In Persia and Turkey, the word paighambar, or he who bears a message is used. As an abstract noun, the word nubuwwa (prophethood) occurs 5 times in the Koran.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #85

    Mission prophétique.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1004

    Parole, clameur, bruit.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #790

    Rivière.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #699

    Rivière. Il y a 999 rivières dans le corps humain.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word nafs (pl. anfus, nufus) is derived from the verb nafusa meaning to be precious or valuable. As is said naffasa (to cheer up, reassure or relieve) and tanaffasa (to breathe, inhale or pause for a rest). The Taj al-Arus (4:260) lists 15 meanings of nafs and adds two other from Lisan al-Arab (8:119). The word nafs is used in no less than 10 connotations in the Koran.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #86

    L'Ame Universelle, la 2e Intelligence, émanée du Aql-Qul*. Source de la 3e Intelligence (Ruhani Adam)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #700

    De NaGaR = cité, grande ville. PREM NaGaR*, PATanR*

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The term khariji (pl. khawarij) has been held to mean seceder or deserter. They are those who have ""gone out against"" (kharaja ‘ala) Ali, or ""went out"" and ""made a secession"" from the camp of Ali in the sense of rebelling against him. Ali’s decision to submit the fate of the battle of Siffin to arbitration did not meet with the approval of his Iraqian soldiers, and about 12,000 of whom deserted and rebelled against him on the march back to Kufa, known as the Kharijis. They also came to be known as Harurites from the place where they were first encamped.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word nahj means road and balagah is derived from baligh means to convey. The Nahj al-Balagah means the way of eloquence or way of rhetoric. It is the collection of 238 sermons (khutba), 79 letters and 478 short sayings of Ali bin Abu Talib, the first Imam. It was compiled by Sharif ar-Radi (d. 406/1015) and his brother al-Murtada Ali bin Tahir (d. 436/1044).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #701

    Regard. Se dit du Regard de l'Imam qui donne le DIDAR* (vision).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The terms used in the Koran and hadith for what is meant by the word "salvation" are najat (redemption), fawz (success), falah (prosperity), and sa'ada (happiness). The first term, together with its different derivatives, is frequently used for both kinds of salvation (28:25, 17:67, 11:58, 21:76, 19:72, 61:10, 40:41). Fawz and its derivatives, however, often refer to salvation in the hereafter only (3:185, 4:73, 23:111, 59:20, 78:31, 3:188).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #702

    Pur. V. du'a "ayimatil atahar", Naklanki Gita*, g. 293.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #703

    Nom, Verbe.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Names in Arabic generally consist of five elements: First, the personal name (ism), such as Muhammad, Ali or Hussain, or two names, like Muhammad Ali or Hussain Ali. Second is the formal name, kunya, which denotes a personal relationship of the bearer of name to another person, for example, Abu Muhammad (the father of Muhammad) or Umm Ahmad (the mother of Ahmad). It is a surname in addition to the ism.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #704

    Expression signifiant avec humilité et tolérance.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The giving of the name to the newly born child by the Imam is an Islamic practice in Ismailism. While going back to the early history of Islam, it appears that the tradition was common in the period of the Prophet. The ancient Arabs excelled in inventing nasty names for their enemies, but the Koran (49:11) forbade them not to use pejorative sobriquets: "Do not scoff at each other or give each other derisory nicknames" (wala talmizu anfusakum wala tanabazu bi

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #673

    Humilité. V. TCHAR MANEK

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #963

    NaW NanD. 9 cieux?. g. "JaNAJO" de Pir Shams.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #87

    Arabe = Nadi. Vente aux enchères. Tradition du temps du Prophète Mohamed. V. Mehmani*.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word nandi is corrupt form of nadi, whose original form is na'd in Arabic, meaning to call. The word nida means auction. The word na'd is used 29 times in the Koran. Another view suggests that the nandi is a Hindi word meaning blessing. It is a form of mehmani, and entertainment to the Imam. Nandi is an Islamic practice to offer food etc. to the Imam. It is an oblation presented in Ismailism.

    Word Reference: 
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #705

    Seigneur, Dieu. Nar Naklanki*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #706

    Oranges.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Abu Hatim ar-Razi was followed by Abu Abdullah Muhammad bin Ahmad an-Nasafi and Abu Yaqub as-Sijistani staying at Ray. An-Nasafi operated the mission mostly in Khorasan and Bukhara, and gained great success in converting the Sunni ruler, Nasr bin Ahmad, who had given allegiance to Imam al-Mahdi and paid him an annual tribute of 119 thousand dinars. Nasr bin Ahmad also entered into correspondence with Imam al-Qaim in Maghrib.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #71

    Verset abrogeant. Opp: Mansoukh (abrogé)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "His full name as cited in his works, was Abu Mu'in Nasir bin Khusaro bin al-Harith al-Marwazi al-Qubadiyani. He was born in 394/1003 in Qubadiyan, a district of Balkh in Khorasan. He belonged to a family of government officials and his brother was a vizir. He, too, entered the government service in the capacity of a finance controller and in time was a successful courtier in the local Ghaznavid court. He was full of ambition, mentally alert and gifted in writing poetry. He also took interest in philosophy, natural science and various religions.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Nasiruddin Tusi was born in Tus, Khorasan in 597/1202. In his youth, about in 624/1227, he entered the service of Nasiruddin Abdu Rahman bin Abu Mansur (d. 655/1257), the Ismaili governor in Kohistan. During his long stay at Qain and other strongholds in Kohistan, Nasiruddin Tusi procured his close friendship with the Ismaili governor, to whom he also dedicated in 633/1235 his famous work on ethics, entitled Akhlaq-i Nasiri. He went to Alamut and espoused Ismaili faith. In his Sayr wa Suluk (pp.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word naskh means changing or removing as it is said in Arabic naskhatish shams-azzil meaning the sun removed the shade or nasakhat al-ruhu athar al-qawmi idha adamat meaning the mind obliterated traces of the nation. The word naskh is also used in the law to denote "an order canceling the other order." It appears that once the law given for a people for a particular time must change with the passage and need of time or be improved to pave a way for further progress.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #88

    Investiture. Montrer - pas nommer.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word nass is derived from nasaba meaning to raise a thing so that it is visible. Thus, nass means designation, referring to the designation of the successor of the Imam. The Imam has his authority to appoint his successor, and it is not from any human electors or from the pledge of ordinary people.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #328

    Son of Pir Qasim Shah. Nomited to Pir by Imam Nurudin Ali.

    Fils de Pir Qasim Shah. Nommé par l'Imam Nooruddin Ali.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #330

    One of Pir Sadardin's six brothers. Was he also known as Sayyed Nassiruddin Kalandar Shah.

    Un des 6 frères de Pir Sadardin. (Est ce le même que Seyyed Nassiruddin Kalandar Shah qui etait aussi frère de Pir Sadardin).

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #329

    Son of Pir Shams. Born in Sabzwar. Became Pir in 757AH at the age of 100 years. During the 10 years of his Piratan he travelled to Punjab, Kashmir, Sind and Gujerat.

    Fils de Pir Shams né à Sabzwar. Pir en 757AH à l'âge de 100 ans. Durant les 10 années de son Piratan, il voyagea au Punjab, Kashmir, Sind et Gujerat.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word natiq (pl. nutaqa) means speaking and samit means silent one, the successor to a speaker (natiq). For further detail, see IMAM AL-NATIQ

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Navroz is a Persian word, meaning new day of the year. The Arabs pronounced it as Niruz or Nairuz. The Sogdians called it Nau-Sard (the new year), and also is called Nishat Afroz Jashan in Iran. It is a spring festival, beginning with the first day of the Persian solar year, corresponding to the vernal equinox and the entry of the sun into the sign of Aries, and continued until the 6th day of the month. The last day was known as the Great New Year's Day (al-Niruz al-Akbar).

  • Noun

    From my BUI Grade 7-8 materials (back from the 1990's).
    Navroz in Fatimid Egypt

    According to Maqrizi when General Ghazi Jawhar entered Egypt in Shabaan 969 A.D, the country was already suffering from acute shortage of food due to one and half year old famine. The General arranged to bring grain from Qairawan. Hundreds of boats of grain arrived in due course but it did not help to ease the sitaution. Starvation and epidemic killed hundreds of thousands of people.

    Word Reference: 
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It a traditional pilgrimage of the Ismailis to sacred site at the end of village of Dizbad in Iran, where gushes a spring from a rock called Naw Hisar. This pilgrimage takes place every year during a transition period after the summer, but before the harvest of plums, which is an important source of village income. The event also takes place just as the educated members of the jamat return from their holidays, such as the teachers, medical officials and government employees. It implies that the pilgrimage takes place during the time of family reunion and communal gathering.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #707

    9 mondes. 9 continents. 9 Intellects. 9 planètes. (7 cieux + terre + enfer)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #89

    Nouveau jour. Célébré le 1er jour du printemps. Fête nationale â l'époque fatimide. Depuis Roi Jamshid en Iran. Symbolise la résurrection de l'âme.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #954

    NaWSO NaWAnROUn NaDIYOUn. Plusieur sens. Il y a 999 rivières dans le corps humain.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Arabic word nazr (pl. nazur) means an offering, gift or present, occurring seven times in the Koran. The Persian noun word nazrana means a gift offered especially to a prince to pay respect. Nazrana is a "special gift" in the Ismailis to be presented to the Imam mostly during the mehmani or any occasion to earn best blessings. It is presented individually on behalf of the family as well as collectively on behalf of a jamat or the all jamats of a country.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #708

    V. SNEH.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #933

    Son, notre propre.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Arabic word for marriage is nikah, meaning uniting. The family is the basic social unit in Islamic society, and marriage is the fundamental Islamic institution. The husband and wife are the principals of family formation. Parents are held responsible for the social, cultural and moral growth of children as well as for their physical and health care.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #923

    Dix mille millions. 10 000 000 000.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #500

    De nir=sans et akar= forme. Sans Forme. "NIRINJaN - NIRAKAR", Invisible et sans forme. Surnom de Dieu.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #924

    Absorbé, attaché.

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