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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #683

    Mère. MATA KOUNTA*

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #369

    Title give by Imam Sultan Mohammed Shah to Begum* Om Habibah. Her residence was in Cannes and Aswan. [Gallery]

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mata salamat means mother of peace. This is a unique title awarded only to three mothers of different Imams during last thirteen hundred years, such as Sarcar Bibi Marium Khatoon, Lady Aly Shah and Umm Habibeh.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Mlle Blanche Yvette Labrousse, the widow of Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah was born on February 15, 1906 in Sete, near Marseilles. Her parent moved to Cannes when she was a baby. Her father was a tram-conductor. She always remembered her parent for the moral code instilled in her. She was granted the title of Miss Lyon and became Miss France in 1930 in a nation-wide beauty contest, and in the same year she went to Rio de Janiero to represent her country at an international event. She married to Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah at the age of 39 years on October 9, 1944 in Switzerland.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #371

    M. 1248AH.After the death ofPir Mirza Mohammed Baqir*, Imam Aga Hassanali nominated his mother. He sent her to India in 1829, She was the first Pir in India after the death of Pir Tajdin in 1471

    M. 1248AH. Après la mort de Pir Mirza Moh'd Baqir*, Imam Aga Hassanali nomma sa mère. Envoyée en Inde en 1829. 1er Pir en Inde après la mort de Pir Tajdin 1471.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #684

    Poussière. "MAtI MITadI RIdI BHIdI JAYSHE" (Poussière dans poussière...).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #74

    V. HAZaR.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    When the Prophet summoned the nations the message of Islam, one of his letters was addressed to Shurahbil bin Amr, the ruler of Ghassan, and the vassal of Caesar of Rome. The letter of the Prophet was carried by Harith bin Umayr, who was killed at a place called Mauta, a village not far from Balka in Syria. The murder of the Muslim envoy by a feudatory of the Roman empire was an outrage, which could not be passed over in silence.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Shi'ites from Iran were not granted equal status by their Arab co-citizens in the social system of Kufa, and thus they were called mawali (sing. mawla) means clients, a term to indicate inferior social standing, or second-class citizens. The expression mawla at the latest stage of its evolution means the people descended from foreign families whose ancestors, or even they themselves, on accepting Islam, have been adopted into an Arab tribe, either as freed slaves or freeborn aliens.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Some 127 meanings of the word mawla have been given in the lexicons, notably master, lord, or one who deserves superior authority, guardian or patron. The Koran says, "God is Guardian (mawla), and He gives life to the dead" (42:9) and "He is your Master (mawla); how excellent the Master (mawla) and how excellent the Helper!" (22:70). The word mawla occurs in different forms in the Koran, such as mawali (4:33.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The soul is the principle of life, which leaves the body at the moment of death. Human life is not the individual's property but a divine gift to be used in God's service or to be dedicated to a divine cause or to God Himself. Death is no longer the end of life, but only the end of the appointed period (ajal) in which humans are tested in the world. Death in this perspective is simply the end of a testing period and a threshold, which must necessarily passed.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #311

    Descendant of Salman Pak*. He was trained at the Dawa by the order of Imam al-Baqir and raised to Dai Al-Akbar by Imam Jafar as-Sadiq. He was also sent to Syria along with Imam Ismail.

    Descendant de Salman Pak*, formé à la Dawa par l'Imam al-Baqir et promu Dai al-Akbar par l'Imam Jafar as-Sadiq qui l'envoya en Syrie auprès de l'Imam Ismail.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "He was born in Ahwaz in Iran. He belonged to the Makhzumi clan and was the mawla (freed slave) of Imam Muhammad al-Bakir and Imam Jafar Sadik. His surname al-Qaddah is usually taken to mean oculist, which seems extremely doubtful. It is a word connected with al-qidah i.e., an ancient Arab play or a form of divination with the help of arrows. Tusi (d. 460/1068) in Tahdhibul Ahkam while dealing with Maymun al-Qaddah, explains the word as "a man who practises the game of qidah (yabra'ul qidah).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mazhar is derived from zahr meaning to manifest or become apparent. Thus, the mazhar means epiphanic form, or more accurately theophany, that is to say a manifestation of God. In Ismaili tariqah, the Imam is the mazhar, who bears Divine Light in the terrestrial world. He is the most perfect expression of the divine hypostasis because in him the theomorphosis is fully realized and the Absolute becomes manifest to mortal eyes.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The city in the Arabian peninsula that was the birthplace of the Prophet of Islam, which due to the presence of the Kaba therein, is revered as one of the holy cities in Islamic culture. Mecca was also known as Makuraba. Mecca is explicitly mentioned twice in two relatively passages of the Koran (in 48:24, makka; and in 3:96 spelt bakka). Several other passages make reference to the city or its surroundings, such as 14:37: "a valley without cultivation." Initially it was only the tribe of Qoraish, which lived in Mecca, and of which the Prophet was a member.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Treaty of Hudaibia had been nearly two years in force. Acting on the discretion allowed by the treaty, Banu Khazao and Banu Bakr, inhabiting Mecca and its neighborhood, the former had become the allies of the Prophet, the latter had entered into an alliance with Qoraish. These two rival tribes had been fighting among them for a long time. Aided by a party of Qoraish, Banu Bakr attacked by night an unsuspecting encampment of Banu Khazao, and slew several of them. The Khazao were forced to take refuge in the Kaba, where they were also persecuted.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Medina, one of the major settlements of the Hijaz and some 350 km to the north of Mecca, was in pre-Islamic times commonly called Yathrib (the Iathrippa of the Greek geographers). The town is named in the Koran (33:13) where the Medinan Muslims are addressed as "people of Yathrib" (ahl yathrib). This name was also in vogue in pre-Islamic poetry and in the Constitution of Medina.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Meditation is a deep religious thought over a particular subject. It is a strenuous spiritual exercise requiring composure of mind, internal quietitude, abstraction from sense and persistent concentration of attention. It can also be defined briefly as devotion or contemplation in a particular pious direction. The term is invariably used in an esoteric sense and associated with human indulgence in establishing communion with the Divine.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #68

    V. Mahdi.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #985

    "Eji awengo naklank patra méndi shah karé douldoul aswariya" g. 283:2

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #75

    Offrande, hospitalité. Plat offert â l'Imam. V. Awal Sufro, V. Thar soufro, V. Nandi.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word mehmani means hospitality. When one makes a private audience with the Imam, it is called mehmani, and before that he presents a najwa (offering) to the Imam. There are different words in Persian for the hospitality, viz. mehman-dari, mehman-parwari and mehman nawazi. Thus the proper word mehmani means an entertainment, banquet, feast or hospitality.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #313

    Son of Aga Aziz, named by Imam Hassanali Shah, succeeded bySeyyed Akbar Ali Beg. Had 2 sons Sayyed Ali Akbar Beg and Seyyed Aki Ashgar Beg.

    Fils de Aga Aziz, nommé par l'Imam Hassanali Shah, succédé par Seyyed Akbar Ali Beg. 2 fils: Seyyed Ali Akbar Beg et Seyyed Aki Ashgar Beg.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #685

    Laisser, déposer.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #686

    Mes, les miens.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The First MicroFinance Bank Ltd (FMFBL) is the Pakistan's first private sector micro credit institution licensed by State Bank of Pakistan under the Microfinance Ordinance, 2001. The Ordinance defines that the FMFBL borrowers are those whose annual income is below the taxable limit. The Microfinance Institutions are allowed under this Ordinance to provide a whole range of services under one roof such as granting loans, generating deposits, providing remittance facilities and other related financial services.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #687

    Chemin, route. aRDHI MIJaLE = mi-chemin. Relation avec MaNZIL*?

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    MIRACLE [ see MUJIZAH ]

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #689

    Maison, lieu de prière. Equiv. jamatkhana*

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word miraj is derived from uruj means to ascend. The Koran (70:4) says, "To Him ascend the angels and soul" (taruljul malaikatu war'ruhi ilaihi), and in 97:4: "Angels and soul (from Him) descend (tanz'zalul malaikatu wa'ruhi), and also in 70:3: "Lord of the ways of ascent" (minal'lahi zil ma'arij).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The reform introduced by Islam into the rules relating to inheritance is twofold; it makes the female a co-sharer with the male, and divides the property of the deceased person among his heirs on a democratic basis, instead of handling it all over to the eldest son, as is done by the law of primogeniture. The Arabs had a very strong tradition that he alone could inherit who smites with the spear, and therefore they did not give any portion of inheritance to such of the heirs as were not capable of meeting the enemy and fighting in battles.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #139

    Young son of Imam Aga Abul Hassanali. Was nominated Pir in 1780, was a Hujjat for 3 Imams. Gave his daughter's hand Bibi Maryam Khatun in marriage to Imam Shah Khalillullah (who was also his nephew)

    Jeune frère de l'Imam Aga Abul Hassanali, nommé Pir en 1780, Hujjat de 3 Imams. Donna sa fille Bibi Maryam Khatun à son neveu l'Imam Shah Khalillullah.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #315

    (1086AH/1675 - 1143AH/1730.) Imam Qasim Ali*, nominated by his father,and succeeded by his son Abul Hassan Ali*.

    (1086AH/1675 - 1143AH/1730.) Imam Qasim Ali*, nommé par son père, succédé par son fils Abul Hassan Ali*.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #690

    Outre.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #134

    sv. NOUR BaKSH, Seyyed.

    V. NOUR BaKSH, Seyyed.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #691

    Sucré, bon. Se dit de paroles mielleuses ou véridiques.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The important task before the Prophet after migration was to determine and clarify the relations between the various tribes and the Muslims in Medina. The Jews were a considerable power in Medina. It appears that they were Arabs by descent, but formed a distinct unit by reason of their adoption of Judaism. They were subdivided into three clans, the Banu Qainuqa, Banu Nazir and Banu Quraiza. The other inhabitants of the town were the Aws and Khazraj, always at war with each other.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #692

    De MItI = poussière. Temporaire, poussière.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mizan (pl. mawazin) is derived from the root wazn meaning the knowing of the measure of a thing. It is true that the measure of material things is judged by a pair of scales or by some other implement, but the deeds of man need no scales for their measurement.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #76

    L'Instauré Initial, Aql-i Qul*

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #316

    (417AH-500AH.) Poet and Dai, educated in Tripoli then at Dar al-Hikmat, where he stayed for 10 years. Is buried at Jabal as-Sumaq. Has written many Qasidas.*

    (417AH-500AH.) Poète et dai éduqué à Tripoli puis au Dar al-Hikmat o

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #222

    (172AH-242AH). Born atMohamedabad, son of Pir Imamuddin. Was nominated to Pir by Imam Wafi Ahmad.Travelled to Iran and Iraq. Had 5 sons. Died at 71 years of age.

    (172AH-242AH). Né à Mohamedabad, fils de Pir Imamuddin. Nommé par l'Imam Wafi Ahmad. Voyagea en Iran et Iraq. Eut 5 fils. Mort à 71 ans.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #392

    V. Pir Solehdin.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #317

    (425-487AH) Nominated as Pir in 458 by Imam Mustansirbillah I. Son of Pir Hashem Shah, born at Yemen. Converted the Hindus of Kanbi, Kharwa, and Kodi. Also called Pir Satgur Noor.

    (425-487AH), nommé Pir en 458 par Imam Mustansirbillah I. Fils de Pir Hashem Shah, né au Yemen, converti les Hindous de Kanbi, Kharwa, Kodi. Nommé Satgour Nour.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #319

    Son of Baba Hashem Shah. Nominated as Pir by Imam Nizar Ali.

    Fils de Baba Hashem Shah. Nommé par l'Imam Nizar Ali.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #77

    Le ferme. Opp: Motashabih - l'ambigu.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Muhammad bin Ali, surnamed al-Mohtadi is reported to have born in 500/1106. He was the first Ismaili Nizari Imam to be born in Iran. He is also called Muhtab and Muhammad I.

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