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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #570

    Faire.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #909

    Connection.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #571

    Qualités, attributs (divins). opp. aWGOUnR*. V. NIRGOUnR*, SIRGOUnR*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #226

    De Goupt = caché. Nom donné aux Ismaéliens indiens qui pratiquaient le Taqia* sous le manteau de l'indouisme. Il y en avaient environ 3000 â Bhawnagar en 1988.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #572

    Ma

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #42

    (Sanscr). Long GINAN* en vers ou prose. (Ex: Man Samjani de SS en 8020 Versets). Litterature divine non dévotionnelle. Equiv. FaRMAN*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1007

    De Girath = beurre, crème. V. SOUKHRIT. Le Dayt Kalingo fera du grath avec de l'eau. g. 161:6

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #225

    See. Gulam Cumbar

    V. CUMBAR

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Ismailis in Punjab are known as the Shamsi, the followers of Pir Shams. They professed their faith secretly, and were also known as the gupti (secret ones). They were tinged with the Hindu social customs, and called the prayer-hall as dharamshala and the Imam as dharam guru. The gupti Ismailis spread over 73 different villages of Punjab, having 35 Jamatkhanas. In 1912, there was a riot between the Hindu and the Shamsi Ismailis in Amritsar, and several Ismailis lost their lives.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The guru is composed of two Hindi words, gu (darkness) and ru (light), and thus, guru means one who provides light in darkness. The tradition of guru has been quite strong in Indo-Pakistan subcontinent. It does not mean merely a teacher, but also a religious guide to his disciples. In the Indian tradition of the Ismailis, the word guru has different meanings according to the context in which it is used. First, guru stands for the Imam. Secondly, it stands for the Pir.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #43

    La limite, le degré, (pluriel = Hodud.)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Abu Ali Hasan, or Ali, surnamed al-Hadi was born in Cairo in 470/1076. He was about 17 years old on the eve of the death of Imam al-Mustansir, and 20 years during assumption of Imamate in 490/1097. Henceforward, the seat of Imamate transferred from Egypt to Iran owing to the bifurcation among the Ismailis, where Hasan bin Sabbah had founded the Nizarid Ismaili state in the fortress of Alamut.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word hadith (pl. ahadith), occurring 23 times in the Koran, is a noun formed from the verb hadatha means to be new. The Hebrew hadash carries the same meaning. From this followed the use of the term for a piece of news, tale, story or a report. The story tellers were also called hudath. The Muslims since the very lifetime of the Prophet called the report with regard to his sayings as the hadith.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word aman al-ummah means the security of the ummah. The Prophet is reported to have said: "Just as the stars are a means of securing (aman) the people of the earth against drowning, my Ahl al-Bayt is a means of securing my ummah from division" (Mustadrak, 3:149 etc.). In this context, according to ar-Risala fi l-Imama (comp. 408/1017) by Abul Fawaris Ahmad ibn Yaqub, Imam al-Muizz said in a speech he delivered on the day of fast-breaking in Cairo that, "O people, God has chosen a Messenger and Imams.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The famous hadith states, "Ali is always with the Truth and the Truth is always with him." This tradition has been transmitted through fifteen channels. Under the commentary of al-Bismillah, Fakhruddin Razi quotes the Prophet as saying in Tafsir-i Kabir that, "And the truth turns with him (Ali) wherever way he turns" (wa dara al-haqq ma'ahu haithu dar)

    HADITH-I KISA [ see AYAT AL-TATHIR ]

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Hadith al-Kudsi means the sacred tradition. It is also called Hadith Ilahi or Hadith Rabbani (divine tradition). It is a class of traditions which gives words spoken by God, as distinguished from Hadith Nabawi (prophetic tradition) which gives the words of the Prophet. Hadith al-Kudsi is a report or saying transmitted by the Prophet which God speaks in the first person. These reports do not form part of the Koran. It also does not necessarily come through Jibrail, but may have come through inspiration (ilham) or in dream (ru'ya).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Anas bin Malik related the Prophet as saying: "Surely the likeness of my Ahl al-Bayt is similar to Noah's Ark, whoever boards it will attain salvation and whoever remains behind is drowned." The word safina means ark, and thus this tradition became known as the Hadith al-Safina. This tradition is narrated by eight Companions of the Prophet, and eight persons from the disciples of the Companions, and by sixty scholars and more than ninety authors.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word saqlain means weighty or heavy thing. In his saying, the Prophet called the Koran and Ahl al-Bayt as the weighty things, and thus this tradition became known as Hadith al-Saqlain. This tradition was spoken on four major occasions, such as at Arfat (Tirmizi, 5:328), at Ghadir Khum (Nisai, 96:79), at Prophet's Mosque in Medina (Ibn Atiyyah, 1:34) and in Prophet's chamber during his last illness (Ibn Hajar, p. 89). This tradition however became more famous at Ghadir Khum.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word ta'ir means a bird or a thing that flies off. Hakim in Mustadrik (3:130), Abu Nu'aym in Hilyah (6:339), etc. report that once when the Prophet sat down to eat a fowl that had been cooked for his dinner, he prayed to God: "My Lord, bring the most beloved of Your creatures, that he may eat this fowl with me." In the meantime, Ali bin Abu Talib came and the Prophet ate with him. Hence, this tradition became known as Hadith al-Ta'ir.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word yaum al-dar means the day of the house. In the fourth year of the Prophet's mission, God commanded him to proclaim openly his call. The Koran says: "And warn thy tribe of near kindred" (26:24). Thus, the Prophet invited the chiefs of Banu Hashim to a banquet. In the end, the Prophet stood and said, "I have brought for you the best of this world and the next. God has commanded me to invite you to it.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word manzila means rank. The Prophet took march for military operations to Tabuk during the month of Rajab of the 9th year after Hijra. He departed from Medina heading an army of 25000 soldiers aiming at the borders of Jordan. He left Ali bin Abu Talib to take his place in Medina.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    There is the highly controversial episode in the last days of the Prophet's life, which is also called the Episode of Pen and Paper. The Prophet, while in his terminal illness and only days before his death, called for pen and paper. According to Bukhari (1:41), when the Prophet's illness became serious, he said, "Bring me writing materials that I may write for you something, after which you will not be led into error." Umar said, "The illness has overwhelmed the Prophet.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    In Ismaili tariqah when one enters the Jamatkhana, he in a bold clear voice utters Hai Zinda i.e., "He (Imam) is living." In reciprocation of which, those assembled within the prayer hall respond by pronouncing Qaim Paya i.e., (We) found (Imam) for ever." When the prayer is in progress, Hai Zinda is not pronounced aloud, but wished in the mind by those who enter the prayer hall.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    When Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah was on tour of East African countries, a suit was filed against him at Bombay High Court on 1st Muharram, 1326/February 4, 1908 by Haji Bibi, the daughter of Aga Jhangi Shah and the widow of Muchul Shah (d. 1321/1903) with her son Samad Shah and Kutchuk Shah and 13 others. They claimed rights from the property of Imam Hasan Ali Shah. Haji Bibi demanded for monthly allowance, servants salaries, fooding, furniture, maintenance and car along with Rs. 9010/- per year at the rate of 6%. The court started the proceeding from January 4, 1908.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word hajj literally means repairing to a thing for the sake of a visit (al-qasd li-l ziyara), and in the technicality of law of repairing to the House of God to observe the necessary devotions (iqamat an li-l-nusuk). The word hajj occurs nine times in the Koran in five different verse (2:189), three times in 2:196, three times; and once each in 2:197, 9:3 and 22:27.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    He was born on 23rd Rabi I, 375/August 14, 985 in Cairo, and was the first Fatimid Imam born on Egyptian soil. His name was al-Mansur Abu Ali, surnamed al-Hakim bi-Amrillah (He who governs by the orders of God). He acceded the throne in 386/996 at the age of 11 years, 5 months and 6 days. Makrizi writes in Itti’az (p. 386) that, "On the following morning the dignitaries assembled in the Grand Hall to await the new Caliph. Al-Mansur, wearing the diamond turban, entered the Hall and walked to the golden throne, the assembly bowing to the ground meanwhile.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The words halal means lawful, allowed or permitted, and haram means unlawful, forbidden or prohibited, and cognate terms from the trilateral roots h-l-l and h-r-m respectively, most often designate these two categories and are of relatively frequent occurrence. The Koranic declaration of lawfulness or unlawfulness are limited to a relatively few areas of the law as later elaborated by the jurists.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #228

    (857-922) Persian mystic influenced by ismailis and decapitated for declaring"An-al Haqq - I am the truth"; studied and translated by Massignon.

    (857-922.) Mystique persan influencé par et accusé d'être ismaélien et décapité pour avoir dit "An-al Haqq - je suis la Vérité". étudié et traduit par Massignon.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Hamiduddin Kirmani was born most probably in 352/933. His family hailed from Kirman as his name indicates, but it is not known where he was born. He first studied the esoteric science under Abu Yaqub al-Sijjistani (d. 360/971), and then went to Cairo for further studies.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word hanif (pl. hunafa) is derived from hanf, meaning an inclination in the forepart of the foot or inversion of the foot. A person having this distortion of the foot is called ahnaf. The singular word hanif occurs 10 times in the Koran (2:135, 3:67, 95; 4:125, 6:79, 161; 10:105, 16:120,123, 30:30), and the plural hunafa two times (22:31, 98:5). It occurs once as a synonym of muslim (3:67) and also in juxtaposition with the verb aslama (4:125).

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #229

    1. Horse (mystical) of Tara Rani* during Treta jug*. Was sacrificed and brought back to life during the Ghat Pat ceremony. 2. Also known as Dul dul* Hazart Ali's horse. (sv. Bourakh)

    1. Cheval (mystique?) de Tara Rani* au Tréta Joug*. Sacrifié et rendu à la vie lors du Ghat Pat*. 2. Surnom de Doul Doul* le cheval de Hazrat Ali. (V. Bourakh)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #947

    2e. catégorie de femme. V. PaDaMSI.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #44

    Réalité spirituelle, pluriel de HaQIQAT*. V. IBARaT, hautes doctrines religieuses appartenant aux prophètes.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #640

    (Du persan haram zadeh = bâtard), enfant. Descendance illégitime.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word harb is derived from h-r-b means to fight, and harb al-fijar means a war of transgression. The Prophet took part in the battle at the age of twenty, between the Qoraish and the Qais, which goes under the name of harb al-fijar, so called because it was fought in the sacred months when warfare was forbidden. But his part in it was not that of actual fighting, but only of handing over arrows to his uncles.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #573

    Vert, humide, frais, mouillé. "HaRIYA BHI HaRIYA aNE SOUKA BHI HaRIYA..."

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #284

    1. Hanuman*, 2. Femme.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #574

    Biche. "HaRNI DHaWRAWE BAL..." (biche allaite son enfant).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word hasad means envy or jealousy. It occurs four times in the Koran, denoting a human emotion that begrudges others and wishes them ill for what they possess.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Hasan Ali, or Abu'l Hasan, surnamed Zikrihi's Salam (peace be on his mention) was born in Alamut. He is reported to have born in 539/1145, but according to another tradition, he was born in 536/1142. The historians call him Hasan II with a view to count Hasan bin Sabbah as Hasan I in the series of Alamut's rulers, while other make his father, Imam al-Kahir as Hasan I and Hasan II to him in the list of Alamut's Imams.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Hasan Ali I, also known as Bakir Shah was born in Kahek. He had also gone to the city of Kirman with his father, but returned to Kahek after assuming the Imamate. In 1085/1674, he betrothed to a Safavid lady, and soon afterwards, there is likelihood that the Imam had taken certain interest in the political arena. In 1105/1693, he was made the governor of Kirman.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Imam Hasan Ali Shah, known as Muhammad Hussain al-Hussaini Mahallati was born in Mahallat in 1219/1804, and assumed the Imamate at the age of 13 years in 1233/1817. His most renowned title was Aga Khan. His name was documented with Bombay Government as His Highness Aga Khan Mahallati. His name however in the Bill of 1830 was written as Pirzada i.e., the son of a saint.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Abu Muhammad Hasan, or Hasan, the elder brother of Imam Hussain was born in 3/625 in Medina. He was also brought up with Imam Hussain in the household of the Prophet until the latter's death when Hasan was about 7 years old. It emerges from the extant traditions that the Prophet had a great fondness for his two grand-children. Hasan and Hussain, whom he referred to as the "chief of the youths of paradise." Another tradition relates, "Both Hasan and Hussain are for me the fragrance in the world" (Masnad, 2:85).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Hasan, the son of Muhammad bin Kiya belonged to the peasant family of Rudhbar. Historian Kamaluddin (d. 660/1262) writes in Bugyat al-talab fi tarih al-Halab that, "Muhammad bin Kiya had two sons, called Hasan and Hussain, whom he put in school with Rashiduddin Sinan, and gave these three an exact treatment that are needed for supporting the children." Hasan was a learned orator and eminent da'i. With the courtesy of manner and eloquence words, he won over the greater part of the Ismailis in Rudhbar and Kohistan.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "He was born on 428/1034 at Qumm. His father, Ali bin Muhammad bin Jafar bin al-Hussain bin Muhammad bin al-Sabbah al-Himyari was of Yamenite origin. From early age he acquired the rudiments of formal education from his father at home. When he was still a child, his father moved to Ray and it was there that Hasan bin Sabbah pursued his religious education.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Pir Hasan Kabiruddin, the son of Pir Sadruddin was generally known as Syed Hasan Shah, Pir Hasan Shah, Syed Sadat, Gur Pir Hasan al-Hussain, Makdum Syed Kabiruddin Shah etc. He is however known in Uchh Sharif as Hasan Dariya. He was born in Uchh Sharif in 742/1341 and was the first Indian pir to be born in India. He was endowed from birth with deep spiritual insight and strong common sense combined with sympathy and love for his fellow beings, and was also noted for his piety since childhood.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #232

    (404 - 458 A.H) declared as Pir in 448 A.H by Imam Mustansirbillah 1.After his death in Cairo in 458 A.H., his eldest son, SatGur Noor succeded him as Pir. He was a great traveller.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #234

    Contemporary of Pir Baba Hasem Shah. Great grand son of Pir Hassan Kabirdin.

    Contemporain de Pir Baba Hashem Shah. Arrière petit-fils de Pir HK.

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