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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #283

    On of the 19 children of Pir Hassan Kabirdin. He is buried at Multan.

    Un des 19 enfants de Pir HK. Enterré à Multan.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It is a poll-tax charged on non-Muslims in place of ushr.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    According to the Koran, the angel who brought revelation to the Prophet is known by the name of Jibrail (2:98). The Arabic form of jibril, which is composed of jibr, meaning abd or servant, and il, meaning God. The word jibrail occurs three times in the Koran (2:97-98, 66:4). Jibrail is also mentioned as Ruh al-Amin (26:193-4), means the divine soul, and also Ruh al-Qudus (16:102), means the holy spirit. In hadith, Jibrail is spoken of as al-Namus al-Akbar (the great angel).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word jihad is derived from jahd or juhd means to strive, exert oneself or take extraordinary pains. Jihad is a verbal noun of the third Arabic form of the root jahada, which is defined classically as exerting one's utmost power, efforts, endeavours or ability in contending with an object of disapprobation. The word jihad is used 36 times in the Koran, and the derivatives of the root occur in 41 Koranic verses. Five of these contain the phrase, jahd aymanihim meaning strong oath.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word jinn is derived from janna, meaning he covered or concealed. It is also said to have derived from idjtinan, meaning to be hidden or concealed. The origin of jinn is said to be fire, and their function is described as that of exciting evil passions or low desires. The Koran is explicit on both these points. As regards the creation of jinn, it says: "And the jinn We created before of intensely fire" (15:27), and again: "And He created the jinn of a flame of fire" (55:15).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #59

    De DJIN, génies, démons, entités spirituelles.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #55

    Paradis, jardin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #595

    Vivant. "Jiré pranri.."

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #596

    Ame. EJI = ô âmes.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #964

    Huit (8). AtH JIW. Les 8 vies. Les 8 personnes dans l'entourage intime de Sourja Rani. g. 151

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #885

    1921-. Bombay. 1939 Musoma. 1959 Mtwara, 1979 Canada. Married Daulat Khanum Pardhan Bhanji during Diamond Jubilee. Al-waez and Rai.Mukhi and Kamaria Mtwara. Council 77

    1921-. Bombay. 1939 Musoma. 1959 Mtwara, 1979 Canada. Epouse Daulat Khanum Pardhan Bhanji au Diamond Jubilee. Al-waez et Ray.Mukhi et Kamaria Mtwara. Council 77

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #904

    Guerrier. V. MAHABar JODA.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #597

    Un JOJaN = 4 GAW*. Lors de Sa lutte contre le Dayt Kalingo, l'Imam voyagera 100 000 jojan en une journée.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #998

    Unité de distance de 4 GAW*. 4x 2 milles = 8 milles = 13 km (approx).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #553

    Les 4 jougs: KaRTA*, TRETA*, DOUAPOUR (DWAPOUR)*, KaLJOUG*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #599

    L'assemblée, tous ensemble. "Joumalé firasta" = assemblée des anges. "Joumalé jamat" = assemblée des fidèles.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The first renowned magazine published from Vancouver was Hikmat (1976) by Ismailia Association for Canada. The Canadian Ismaili appeared in 1976, and Ismaili Canada in 1995 by Ismaili Council for Canada. The Al-Risalah also began from Montreal in 1981.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Jubilee Bulletin started in 1945, which earned the name of Ismaili Prakash in 1947. The Diamond Jubilee Souvenir published in 1946. It was followed by Majlis. In 1950, with the existence of Ismailia Association for Kenya in Nairobi, the Africa Ismaili started and shifted its venue very soon from Mombasa to Nairobi. Africa Ismaili was the first communal journal in Africa to complete 25 years, which formerly used to appear as Ismaili Prakash.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The renowned journal, "The Ismaili France" started from Paris in 1990 and "Ismaili Contact" in Paris in 1992. Both disappeared very soon.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Ismaili Sitaro, (1908) ed. Lalji Bhai Devraj, Khoja Bandhu, Khoja Mitr (1910), Khoja Hitvardak (1910), Satpanth Prakash (1916) ed. by Lalji Bhai Devraj, Ismaili Aftab (1919), ed. by V.N. Hood, then N.M. Budhwani in Dhoraji, Ismaili Akhbar (1920), Khoja Saundariya (1920), Ismaili (1923) ed. A.J. Chunara, Satpanth Prakash, Ismaili Darpan, Ismaili Prakash, Ismaili Bhomiyo, Khoja Sansar (1924), Hindi Panch Himayati (1924) by Verteji. Khoja Reformer (1925).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The first monthly journal, Al-Ghadir started from Beirut in 1953, edited by Mustapha Ghaleb.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Al-Islam (1948) ed. by Ghulam Ali Chunara, Platinum Jubilee Review (1951) ed. by A.J. Chunara, Fidai Chronicle (Dacca, 1953) ed. M.R. Karwa. Mahrab (1954), Paigham (1955) ed. by Muhammad Ali B. Sayani, Parwaz (Dacca), Sargam (1958) ed. Kassim Ghari, Ismaili Mirror (1962), Ismaili World (1964) ed. by Sadruddin J. Hemani, Al-Qandeel (1965) from Peshawer, Al-Ismailia (1967) ed. by Noor Ali B. Mithani. Shinning Stars (1980). Phoolvadi (1980). Sevak (1989) ed. S.K. Tejani.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Ismailia Association for U.K. published Ilm in 1975 and Al-Misbah in 1981. The Ismaili Council for U.K. also brought forth Ismaili Forum in 1980, and also UK Ismaili in 1984.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Ismaili Council for the United States brought out Roshni and The American Ismaili in 1980, and The American Waezeen Digest in 1987.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #60

    (Arabe: JURAH = peu) Offert et béni par l'Imam au jamat. Devient une bénédiction.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #426

    V. PAGrI

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Jubilee is a celebration of a period of time, anniversary or other special occasions. The word jubilee is derived from the Hebrew yobel, meaning ram's horn. In the ancient time, the jubilee was announced by the blowing of the shofar, a trumpet of ram's horn, and as a result, the occasion came to be known as yobel, or jubilee. The Arabic word for jubilee is also yobel, and Turkish ellinci.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "It is one of several veins, taking blood from the head indirectly to the heart. The major ones are the right and left internal jugular veins, which arise from the base of the brain and pass down the sides of the neck, where they join the right and left brachiocephalic veins.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    In Arabic, the word jura or jurrah means a gulp or as much as is swallowed, as it is said jura al-ma'a (he swallowed the water), juratan minadewa (dose of medicine), or jara ar-ma'a (made drunk little water). The Arabic word jarw or jurw also means whelp, cub, small fruit or anything little.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word kaba means it swelled or became prominent or it became high and exalted (ala wa-rtafa'a). The Kaba is a rectangular building in Mecca, almost in the center of the Masjid al-Haram, whereof the front and back walls (north-east and south-west) are each 40 feet in length, and the two side-walls 35 feet each, the height being 50 feet, the four walls running north-west, north-east, south-west and south-east.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #600

    Jamais. KaBI KaBI = quelquefois, de temps en temps.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #288

    Pir Hassan Kabirdin's children:Shah Qalandar, Aulia Ali, Tayed, Alaudin, Farman,Islamuddin, Rehmtullah, Jazuddin, Jaffer, Adam Mehdi, Noor Mehdi, Bu Qalandar Shah, Bhand, Lal Shah Baz Qalandar, Awal Shah, Gheb Shah, Imamuddin, Bai Budhai (the daughter).

    Shah Qalandar, Aulia Ali, Tayed, Alaudin, Farman, Islamuddin, Rehmtullah, Jazuddin, Jaffer, Adam Mehdi, Noor Mehdi, Bu Qalandar Shah, Bhand, Lal Shah Baz Qalandar, Awal Shah, Gheb Shah, Imamuddin, Bai Budhai (la fille).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    When the soul departs from the body at the moment of death, and that which is left behind is nothing but an empty shell. The mortal remains are treated with dignity, love and respect. In Islam, the disposal of the dead body and funerary rites normally include: washing the body, shrouding and prompt burial.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #601

    Jeter, enlever.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #602

    Sortant.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It was another stronghold of the Syrian Ismailis. The Ismaili da'i Abu al-Fath purchased it in Jabal Bahra from Saiful Mulk bin Amrun in 527/1132. The acquisition of Kadmus and another Masiyaf provided the Syrian Ismailis with a territorial nucleus for the Amirate, which they established and lasted for more than a century. Later, the Mamluk Sultan al-Zahir Baybars occupied Kadmus in 671/1273.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #604

    Infidèle. Qui ne remercie pas Dieu.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word kafir (pl. kuffar) is derived from kfr means cover, hide or conceal. In religious context it means to cover benefits received. The verb kafara denotes the characteristics attitude of those who, having received God's gifts of benevolence, try to conceal and ignore them, who are ungrateful to the Gracious God, who even take the offensive against Him.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #605

    Papier.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #606

    (Il) dit.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #291

    City in Iran (Kahek nagri, vircha sher) Residence of Imams Mohammed bin Ismail, Sayyed Ali, Qasim Shah and Aga Hassanali Shah.

    Ville de l'Iran (Kahek nagri, Wirtcha shér). Résidence des Imams Moh'd b. Ismail, Sayyed Ali, Qasim Shah et Aga Hassanali Shah.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #292

    11Century. Servant and friend of Hassan bin Sabbah in Cairo. He had brought back Hadi, the son of Imam Nizar to the custody of Hassan bin Sabbah.

    11e S. Serviteur et ami de Hassan b. Sabbah* au Caire. Il aurait ramené Hadi fils de Imam Nizar auprès de Hassan b. Sabbah. (Hodgson - Order Assassins p. 138)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Hasan bin Muhammad bin Ali, surnamed al-Kahir bi-Quwatullah, or al-Kahir bi-Ahkami'l was born in 520/1126. His official name with Alamut's records was Hasan bin Muhammad, also known as Hasan I.

    In Baghdad, the Abbasid caliph Muktafi (d. 555/1160) was ruling at that time, and was succeeded by caliph Mustanjid (d.566/1170). In Iran, the Seljuq sultan Muhammad I (d. 555/1160) was succeeded by Suleman Shah (d. 556/1161) and Arslan (d.571/1176). In Egypt, the Fatimid ruler al-Faiz (d.555/1160) was followed by al-Adid (d. 567/1171), the last of the Fatimids.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #429

    Demain.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #607

    Temps présent. BHOUT KAr = passé.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #609

    8 secondes. Symbolise le TEMPS.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It is the collection of the different farmans of Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah in Gujrati published by the Ismailia Association for India. It is divided into two volumes, the first was published in 1953, entitled Kalam-i Imam-i Moobin (388 pages), containing the farmans of September 1, 1885 to February 20, 1910. It covered almost 160 visits of the Imam in India and East African countries.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Kalam-i Mawla, i.e., the sayings of Imam Ali bin Abu Talib, is a poetical work of 328 verses, composed in Hindi. It is a manual of ethics for believer, stating the virtues to be cultivated and the vices to be shunned. It is recited in the Jamatkhana.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #611

    (Sanscrit: KaLPA.) 4 320 000 000 années. V. Khalifa kalap égale â 4 320 000 années.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #608

    Cycle du mal. Durée = 432 000 années.

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