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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #639

    Chien.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #644

    Prince, héritier.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #641

    Puits.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #642

    Personne.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #950

    Pitié, faveur. Syn: MaHER

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #273

    An expert in the study of Jabbir ibn Hayyan. Has also written "The Book of the Glorious" and he died with one one of his books under his pillow.

    L'expert de la pensée de Jabbir ibn Hayyan qui écrivit "Le livre du Glorieux" et mourut avec un de ses livres sous son oreiller.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #643

    Colère, fureur. Un des 5 défauts majeurs. (KAM, KROD, MO, LOBH, TRUSHNA)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #525

    33 kror = 330 000 000. (= 5 kror + 7 kror + 9 kror + 12 kror).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Persian word karsazi means religious dues, which was collected by the authorized persons from each region in India. During the post-Alamut period, the musafir was the tithe-collector in the time of Pir Shams. In Sind, the tithe-collector was called khiyto, in Gujrat the bawa and the vakil in Kutchh. In the time of Pir Taj al-Din, two eminent brothers had embraced Ismailism, viz. Shah Kapur and Shah Nizamuddin. Shah Kapur and his descendant executed the role of collecting religious dues in India and transferred to the Imam in Iran.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #310

    Shri Krishna's aunt. Married king Pandav during Dwapur Jug. g."Amar té ayo" of Pir Sadardin.

    Tante de Shri Krishna, épouse du Roi Pandou à l'époque du DUAPOUR JOUG*. g. "Amar té ayo" de Pir Sadardin.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word kursi in Arabic means throne. The Aramaic word kurseya and the Hebrew kisse, both also mean throne. Among the Arabs there is an idiom of calling the learned men or savants, karasi. The word kursi occurs twice in the Koran (2:255 and 38:34)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    (la'n or la'nah means cursing, normally consists of an expression of disapproval or displeasure and an invocation of malediction upon the object of the curse. Curses are often uttered by calling the curse and wrath of God upon someone, or by an invocation in the passive voice where the agent is not always specified, for example: may God's curse be upon him; may he be cursed. Curses are often expressed by verbs with an optative sense, with "to curse, damn" (la'ana) appearing most frequently in the Koran.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #646

    Est venu.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Shamsul Mulk, the daughter of Mirza Ali Muhammad Nizam ad-Dawla, the grandson of Muhammad Hussain Khan Ispahani, the Prime Minister of Shah Fateh Ali Qajar (d. 1250/1834) of Iran; was born in Ispahan. Khurshid Kulah, the mother of Shamsul Mulk was the daughter of Shah Fateh Ali through one of his queens, Tajudawla Ispahani by name. Lady Aly Shah was thus related to the Iranian royal family through her mother.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #647

    Brise, odeur, enthousiasme.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #64

    Divinité.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The battle of Siffin between Ali bin Abu Talib and Muawiya broke out on 8th Safar, 36/July 26, 657. A fierce battle was fought between them on the whole day, and it even continued in the darkness of that night, which is known as lail at-harir (the night of clangour). William Muir writes in The Caliphate, its Rise and Fall (London, 1924, p. 261) that, "Both armies drawn out in entire array, fought till the shades of evening fell, neither having got the better. The following morning, the combat was renewed with great vigour.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    One of the last ten nights of the month of Ramzan is called lail at-Qadr. The word lail or laila means night and qadr means originally measuring. Thus, lail at-qadr is translated as meaning the night of grandeur or night of majesty. In the Koran, it is spoken of in two places. In chapter 97, it is mentioned thrice as lail at-qadr: “Surely, We revealed it on lail at-qadr. And what will make thee comprehend what lail at-qadr is?

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word hilal means slim crescent, while the word badr means full moon. The word appears only once in its plural form, ahilla in the Koran (2:189). The general term in the Koran for moon however occurs 27 times, usually paired with the sun. The Hebrew word hodesh also means new moon. The term lail at-qamar means the night of the crescent. The method of calculation of the new moon was firstly introduced by the Fatimids in 331/942 in North Africa, then in 359/970 at Cairo.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #648

    Honneur, honte. (V. prière de Tara Rani)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #649

    Cent mille (100 000).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #650

    84 lakh = 8 400 000. Se réfère aux incarnations de l'âme avant d'atteindre le salut. (Moksh, mougat, didar). Coran XXXIX:42, II:28, Bahré Rahémat p. 145

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #651

    V. MOUKHTI. g. 378, Farman Wadwan Camp 18 oct. 1903

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "In 489/1095, Hasan bin Sabbah had sent Kiya Buzrug Ummid with a troop to conquer the fortress of Lamasar in 489/1095. He defeated a certain Rasmasuj and took possession of Lamasar, also known as Rudhbar-i Alamut. According to Jamiut Tawarikh (pp. 27-8), "The fort of Lamasar was situated on a rotten hill, with a few decayed houses on it, with no vegetation nearby. The climate of the place was very hot.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #51

    Sens occulte, relatif au monde supra sensible. Appartient aux Awliya.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word lauh means plank, as in Koran (54:13), and also a tablet for writing, and mahfuz means that which is guarded. The expression lauh mahfuz (guarded tablet) occurs but once in the Koran: "Nay, it is a glorious Koran in a guarded tablet" (85:21-22). The word lauh in its plural form alwah is used in connection with the books of Moses: "And We ordained for him in the tablets (alwah) admonition of every kind and clear explanation of all things" (7:145).

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #65

    Night of Power/Destiny. 23rd day of the month of Ramdhan. Night when the Prophet received the first revelation of the Quran. XCVII/1-5. Also symbolizes the night of humanity in this period of occultation.

    Nuit du Destin. 23e. jour du Ramadhan. Nuit de la 1ere révélation. Coran XCVII/1-5. Symbolise la nuit de l'humanité en ce cycle d'occultation.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Examining a critical and analytical approach of the sources, it is almost possible to clarify that the fortress of Alamut was situated in rocky and infertile region, and its physical condition during occupation was very much rough and coarse. It was embosomed with swamps and muddy tracts, accounting unhealthy atmosphere. Hasan bin Sabbah immediately embarked on the task of renovating the castle, which was in great need of repairs, improving its fortifications, storage facilities and water supply sources.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #652

    Comptes, l'actif, ce qui est écrit, le destin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #653

    Prendre avec.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Life (hay) in the sense of living out one's corporeal existence is, however, paradoxically fraught with danger, illusion and deception. The Koran exhibits an almost platonic rejection of the life of this world (al-hayat al-dunya), characterizing it as nothing but "play and amusement (la'ib wa-lahw) and contrasting it with the reward of the righteous in the hereafter (6:32).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #654

    Prononcer, prendre. "outhta besta sahebji ko nam lijé.." (Se levant, s'asseyant, il faut prononcer en tout temps le Nom de Seigneur).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #655

    Monde ou endroit. TRILOK*, TCHAOUD LOK*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #986

    Yeux, vue. Titre respectueux. (Tara Rani Lotchana)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word ma'ad is derived from the verb ada or awd signifies to return to a place, and thus ma'ad means the ultimate place of one's returning. It is also treated as a synonym of raja'a, which is also used in the Koran (2:28) to indicate return to God: "Then He will make you die, then He will make you live, then you will be brought back to Him (ilayhi turjaun)". Its verbal form ada denotes to recommence or reiterate.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word ma'sum is derived from the verb asama, means prevented, hindered, protected, defended, preserved, etc. Hence, ma'sum means one who is incapable of error and sin. In Islamic theology, the Arabic term isma both impeccability and closely related notion of infallibility, which is not an inherent quality, but rather a divine gift bestowed on the Prophets and Imams.

    See Immunity of Prophets and Immunity of Imams

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #663

    Mauvaises actions.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The name maghrib (the land of sunset) was given by the Arabs to that virgin part of Africa, which European have called Barbery or Africa Minor, (the French Afrique du Nord), and then North Africa. In north it is bordered by the Mediterranean, and in the south by the Sahara desert. In the west it is extended as far as the Atlantic Ocean, and in the east it extends as far as the borders of Egypt.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #903

    Puissant. Expression: mahabar JODA* (guerrier puissant), "MaN to mahabar Joda." (l'Ego est un guerrier puissant).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #664

    De MAHA = Grand et DIN = jour. Jour du Jugement. (Yauméddin)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #364

    Grand Seigneur. Maha = grand. Déw = Seigneur, ange, divinité.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #66

    Haut stade, haute sphère de méditation. V. Khat Darshan. g. 493, 30.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #67

    (Arabe:) Le Messie. Surnom de l'Imam qui ouvrira le cycle d'épiphanie.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #951

    V. KRaPA.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mahiz means menstruation or the menses, also called hayz – a monthly flow of blood from the uterus. The woman in this condition is called ha’iz or ha’izah. It is a natural monthly discharge of the lining of the uterus. The discharge consists of blood, degenerated cells of the lining, mucus and some bacteria. The menstruation flow normally lasts from four to six days with a variation of two to eight days. A period lasting more than eight days is abnormal. The amount of blood loss average 33 milliliters (ml) or about one ounce.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #307

    (443AH-509AHh). Pir in 487AH. Son of Pir Satgur Noor, born in Sabzwar. Had 6 sons. Also known as Mahmood Sabzwari. Killed in Lahore. Was also a companion of King Massud.

    (443AH-509AHh). Pir en 487AH, fils aîné de Pir Satgour Nour, né au Sabzwar. 6 fils. Connu sous le nom de Mahmood Sabzwari. Tué à Lahore.Compagnon du Roi Massood

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #665

    Palais.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Maimundiz was the famous Ismaili stronghold, located to the north of presently village of Shams Kilaya and westward from Alamut. Because of the great altitude, the cold was so extreme as to make it impossible for beasts to find a home or live in that location from the beginning of autumn until the middle of spring. According to Jamiut Tawarikh (p. 122), the construction of the fortress of Maimundiz began in 490/1097, but Kashani (d. 738/1338) determines in 497/1103 in his Zubdat al-Tawarikh (p. 144).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Abbasids took notice of the rapid conversion of the Ismailis in Khorasan, notably Nasr bin Ahmad, and insinuated Nuh bin Nasr (331-343/943-954), the son of Nasr bin Ahmad; against his father and the Ismailis. Nuh bin Nasr dethroned his father and conducted a barbarous massacre of the Ismailis in 331/942, known in the Ismaili history as al-mainat al-uzama (great calamity) in Khorasan and Transoxania. An-Nasafi and his chief associates were also executed in the wild operations at Bukhara in 332/943. For this reason, Nasir Khusaro called him Khwaj-i Shahid and Shaikh al-Shahid.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word maisir is derived from different roots, such as yasara means to become gentle, to draw lots by arrows, or yasar means affluence because gambling bring about profit, or yusr means convenience, because gambling is a means of earning without toil, or yasr means dividing a thing into a number of shares. Zamakhshari (d.

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