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The Effects of Succession Crisis between Bayezid II and Cem Sultan on Ottoman Foreign Policy

After the era of Bayezid I who first left Ottoman gradual conquest policy that depended on negotiation and compromise with both local and imperial powers rather than direct centralized authority belonging to Sultan’s initiative, Ottomans faced first interregnum period in which each successor tried to gain power in their regions because of the defeat of Bayezid I in Ankara battle.

A Comparison of the Refugee Resettlement of Ugandan Ismaili Muslims and Cambodian Theravada Buddhists in Canada

This paper will compare the resettlement and ability to recreate religious identities of refugees from Uganda and Cambodia. The specific religious identities of focus are Ugandan South-Asian Ismaili Muslims and Cambodian Khmer Theravada Buddhists, and their resettlement in Ontario, Canada. This paper will argue that the three predominant factors that have made Ugandan Ismailis more successful in their integration into Canadian society than Cambodian Buddhists are; leadership, pre-migrational skills for adaptation and integration, and transnational connections.

A History of Medieval Islam - IX The Turkish Irruption

The entry of the Seljuk Turks into Western Asia in the second half of the eleventh century forms one of the great epochs of world history.

A History of Syncretism of the Khoja Muslim Community

Medieval India seems to have been at the confluence of various grassroots religious/spiritual traditions. One of the important texts in this regard is Dasavatar credited to have been written Pir Sadr-ud-din, the founder of the Khoja Ismaili sect in the 15th century, in Sindh. The Dasavatar renames Kalki of Puranic literature as Nikalanak – the last messiah who is to come at the end of this era; acknowledges Vishnu, and also names Buddha as one of the avatars.

A Modern History of the Ismailis Continuity and Change in a Muslim Community

There are between 70,000 and 80,000 Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims (also known as Nizari Ismaili Muslims, or simply, Ismailis) in Canada. The largest settlements are in Toronto and Vancouver, with substantial communities (jamats; jama'ats) located in Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal and Ottawa. Ismaili migration to Canada .occurred in the 1950s, with significant increases taking place between the 1970s and 1990s.1 The expulsion of Ugandan Asians in 1972 was the cause of a notable growth in the
community.

A Modern History of the Ismailis Continuity and Change in a Muslim Community

There are between 70,000 and 80,000 Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims (also known as Nizari Ismaili Muslims, or simply, Ismailis) in Canada. The largest settlements are in Toronto and Vancouver, with substantial communities (jamats; jama'ats) located in Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal and Ottawa. Ismaili migration to Canada .occurred in the 1950s, with significant increases taking place between the 1970s and 1990s.1 The expulsion of Ugandan Asians in 1972 was the cause of a notable growth in the
community.

A Semiotics of Infinite Translucence: The Exoteric and Esoteric in Ismaili Muslim Hermeneutics

The complex juxtaposition of private practice and public visibility/invisibility of contemporary Ismaili Muslims has certain parallels with other religious communities, but it exhibits unique features. This community adheres to an esotericism that has shaped its hermeneutic and communication practices. In a seeming paradox, the group is also extensively engaged in the public sphere. However, its communal institutions are limiting the dissemination of texts pertaining to the religious addresses and biography of the group’s leader, Aga Khan IV.

A Short History of the Ismailis Traditions of a Muslim Community

The Ismailis represent the second largest Shi‘i Muslim community after the Twelvers (Ithna‘ asharis), and are today scattered as religious minorities in more than twenty-five countries of Asia, Africa, Europe and North America. Despite their long history and contributions to Islamic civilisation, however, they were until recently one of the least understood Muslim communities. In fact, a multitude of medieval legends and misconceptions circulated widely about Ismaili teachings and practices, while the rich literary heritage of the Ismailis remained inaccessible to outsiders.

A SINDHI VERSION OF PIR SHAMS' DAS AVATAAR - An Unpublished Ginan

By Dr. Gulshan Khaki

This paper is partly based on one of my previously published paper [1] and draws freely from it.

A teaching and learning guide for: “A survey of Ismaili studies Part 1” and “A survey of Ismaili studies Part 2”

Ismailis, make up the second largest branch of Shi‘i Islam after the Twelvers (Ithna ‘Ashariyyah). While all Muslims
recognize Prophet Muhammad as the last in a long line of Prophets and Messengers of God and the Qur'an as the
revelation of God's Word, there are differences of interpretation concerning the scope and locus of religious authority
after the death of Muhammad. Sunni Muslims vest religious authority in the Qur'an, the Hadith, and the interpretations
of these sources by the religious scholars (‘ulama) of the community; Shi‘i Muslims believe that the Prophet

Addenda to Secondary Sources in Ismāʿīlī Studies: The Case of the Omissions

To date, there have been two major bibliographies of secondary sources in Ismāʿīlī studies, namely Nagib Tajdin’s A Bibliography of Ismailism1 and Farhad Daftary’s Ismāʿīlī Literature: A Bibliography of Sources and Studies (hereafter referred to as Ismāʿīlī Literature).2 The present bibliography is an attempt to identify sources omitted by these two works within the limits specified below. The purpose of the bibliography, then, is to provide students, scholars, and specialists with organized access to the omissions, thereby supporting research, teaching, and learning

Al-Shaykh al-Ṭūsī: His Writings on Theology and their Reception*

While the theological thought of Twelver Shiʿism during the 3rd/9th and 4th/10th centuries has been studied relatively well (as much as is possible on the basis of the few, mostly secondary sources that are preserved),1 little is known about its doctrinal
developments from the early 5th/11th century onwards.

Al-‘Aziz bi’llah

Al-‘Aziz bi’llah Abu Mansur Nizar b. Abu Tamim Ma‘add al-Mu‘izz li-Din Allah (955–996 CE), the fifth Fatimid imam-caliph was the first sovereign of his dynasty to begin his rule in Egypt. Al- ‘Aziz’s reign epitomises the cultural, intellectual and architectural efflorescence of Fatimid rule in Egypt. It also established the Fatimids as a vibrant Mediterranean Empire, pursuing trade, diplomacy and warfare with their Byzantine, ‘Abbasid and Andalusian Umayyad counterparts.

Alamūt, Ismailism and Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Drawing extensively on the testimony of the Persian historians of the seventh-eighth hijri centuries (corresponding to the thirteen-fourteenth centuries of the Christian era), this article sketches a detailed picture of several personalities involved in founding the nascent Ismaili state centred at Alamūt in the fifth/eleventh century. This background sets the stage for analyzing a new manuscript source documenting Ismaili history and thought of this period, Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Alamūt, Ismailism and Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Drawing extensively on the testimony of the Persian historians of the seventh-eighth hijri centuries (corresponding to the thirteen-fourteenth centuries of the Christian era), this article sketches a detailed picture of several personalities involved in founding the nascent Ismaili state centred at Alamūt in the fifth/eleventh century. This background sets the stage for analyzing a new manuscript source documenting Ismaili history and thought of this period, Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

An Introduction to Chogadia Ginans

By Mumtaz Ali Tajddin Sadiq Ali

The word gadi means "time", corresponding with the Koranic term, sa’a. During the Ancient times in India, day and night were measured in gadi instead of hours or minutes. According to the Holy Koran: "They are indeed in loss who give lie to the meeting with God until when the hour (al-sa’a) comes upon them all of a sudden." (6:31) Here, the hour (al-sa’a) stands for the gadi (moment) of death, which is also depicted in the following lines of a ginan:-

Sayan’ji mor’e dar lago ek din’ko

An Ismaili Interpretation of the Fall of Adam

During a recent stay in Cairo, I found in the Taimuriya library a manuscript copy of an interesting Ismaili work entitled Kitabu'l-idah wa'l-Bayan, by the Yemenite da'i Husain ibn 'Ali (*1)

Antiquities of the Illuminati - 4. THE PURE BRETHREN OF BASRA

4. THE PURE BRETHREN OF BASRA:
Isma'ili, Yezidi, Sufi.

IT IS an impossible task, presenting an entire history of schismatic Islamic
sects and Secret Societies in a short chapter. None of the sects which we shall
be surveying in this section fall under the category of Sabian, proper. However,
since there have been misunderstandings in the West as to the term Sabian, Sabaean,
etc., and to the connections between the Templars, Rosicrucians and Sufis, "Suphees",
"Sufees" "Sophees", "Sophis", etc., the Assassins,

Antoine Isaac Silvestre de Sacy and the Myth of the Hachichins: Orientalizing hashish in nineteenth-century France

Building on recent historical scholarship on drugs and European empires, this study shows how early French conceptions

Avichal allah avichal khalak - Meaning and comments by Mumtaz Ali Tajdddin

The meaning of the Ginan " Avichal Allah, Avichal Khalaq" of Pir Sadardin. (d.1416)

the ginans is 13 couplets is translated and commented line by line and on its concepts. The ginan is in Hindi that incorporates many Persian words and some Arabic ones.

Download link for the PDF file is given here below.

Beyond the Qur’ān: Early Ismaʿīlī Taʾwīl and the Secrets of the Prophets

Scholarship on the history and doctrines of Shi‘i Ismaili Muslims has progressed at a dizzying pace over the last few decades. Most publications in the field to date are historical studies of particular periods of Ismaili history analysing Ismailism’s socio-political activities, such as the famed Fatimid era or the Nizari state of Alamut. Relatively speaking, the study of Ismaili doctrine – theology, cosmology, hermeneutics and soteriology – remains in the early stages.

Cairo - "From the Pages of Glorious Fatimid History"

The history of Cairo dates back to about B.C. 5000 when King Mina united Upper and Lower Egypt and chose Memphis as the capital of the New Kingdom. Memphis survived several dynasties and invaders and finally was rebuilt in 969 A.D., by Jawhar al-Siqily, of the army commanders of the Fatimid Caliph al-Muiz Ladin Allah, and given the modern name of Cairo.

Catalogue of Khojkî Manuscripts available through the Heritage Society

I. Introduction

Challis wato - An Unpublished Granth

by Mukhi Abdulsultan Rahemtulla

Chhatris Kror - An Unpublished Granth

By Dr. Shiraz Ismail

The name Chhatris Kror literally means three hundred and sixty million. It refers to the number of Pir Sadardin's followers out of whom Baar Kror or one hundred and twenty million attained salvation. This granth was composed by Pir Sadardin. It has never been published. From a brief note in one of his books, we learn that Mukhi Lalji Devraj was aware of its existence and intended to publish it. However, for reasons that we do not know it never got published. With Mukhi Devraj's death most of the Ginan publishing activities came to a standstill.

Chiragh-I-Rawshan - An Ismaili Tradition in Central Asia

The
word chiragh is derived from the Syriac shrag or shragh,
meaning lamp, and Chiragh-i Rawshan means shining or luminous
lamp,
which is one of the oldest surviving Ismaili traditions in the
regions of the Central Asia. It is an assembly (majalis) of the
believers, where a lamp is illumined, which is its hallmark, and the Koranic
verses are chanted for the eternal peace of the departed soul, or for the
prosperity of one who is alive.

Circulars of The Religious Study Group Of Mombasa (Consolidated)
Du'a App- Android application for Du'a audio, text & meanings

Dua App by ismaili.net

Dua App by ismaili.net

Dua - Namaz in Shia Ismaili Tariqah

The Shia Muslims were almost united in the period of the first Imam Hazrat Ali (d. 40/661) and Imam Mohammad Bakir (114/733), and during which period, they offered Namaz (Salat) jointly with the Sunni Muslims.

English and the transnational Ismaili Muslim community: Identity, the Aga Khan, and infrastructure

The adoption of English as the official language of the transnational Ismaili Muslim community has its roots in the British Raj, which provides the backdrop for recent Ismaili history. Yet it is the Aga Khan IV, spiritual leader of the community since 1957, who has most avidly pushed English as part of a ‘language policy’.

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