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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word dawa (pl. du'at) is derived from du'a means to call, invite or summon, and thus the term da'i denotes one who summons. The word dawa is also used in the sense of prayers, such as dawat al-mazlum (prayer of the oppressed), or dawa bi'l shifa (prayer of the health). The word dawa virtually coined in the time of Imam Jafar Sadik and Abdullah bin Maymun founded the Ismaili dawa organization in Basra.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The term da'i al-duat means the summoner of the summoners, or the head of the da'is or chief da'i.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Syed Dadu, or Pir Dadu was a gifted vakil in Sind. He was born in 879/1474. He was an efficient scholar of Arabic and Persian and acquired high command in Indian languages. His lineage runs as Syed Daud bin Yasir bin Khair al-Din bin Mahr al-Din bin Gul Muhammad bin Hashim bin Moinuddin bin Aminuddin bin Buraqanuddin bin Shamsul wa Shak bin Quwwamuddin bin Syed Ali bin Muhammad bin Hussain bin Daud bin Zaid bin Ahmad bin Muhammad bin Hamza bin Yousuf bin Hasan bin Sakhaudullah bin Abul Hasan bin Abdullah bin Ali Jawad bin Imam Zayn al-Abidin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #32

    (Arabe). Litt. Celui qui appelle - Missionnaire qui assure la propagation de la foi. V. DAWA(T)*

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Arabic word dajjal likely comes from the Syriac daggal means liar or lying. Hence, al-dajjal literally means one who conceals the truth with falsehood, the liar or a great deceiver. The word al-masih al-dajjal means to cover (a mangy camel) with tar, because the dajjal will in like manner cover the earth with his adherents. One another view suggests that dajjal is derived from dajala meaning to gild because he will deceive the people by covering up the truth.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #916

    Sud. V. 4 Disha.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #505

    Charité, don. "DAN POUN" = Bienfait du don. Bonnes actions. (voir aussi Soukhrit). V. Imam Bégum "To DANa, DANa, DANa abto rahém karogé" g. 61

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #938

    Caractère, habitudes, comportement.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #506

    Grains.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #195

    (1004AD). "House of Knowledge", International university in Cairo founded by Imam Hakim. Holds 2 million books in its libraries.

    (1004 AD.) "Maison de la Sagesse" Université internationale au Caire fondée par l'Imam Hakim. 2 millions de livres dans bibliothèque.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Amid the surging splendour, Imam al-Hakim emerges as an unusual personality judged by any standard. He founded Dar al-Hikmah (House of Wisdom), also known as Dar al-Ilm (House of Knowledge) in 395/1004, where the sciences including astronomy, logic, philosophy, mathematics, history, theology, languages and medicines were taught. Qadi Abul Aziz bin Muhammad bin Noman was its first supervisor. This academy was connected with the royal palace, enriched with a huge library, and distinct conference rooms and chambers.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #197

    (10/11th Century) School of Medicine founded in Sicily by Imam al-Hakim. Includes a huge medical library.

    (10/11e S). Ecole de médecine fondée en Sicile par l'Imam al-Hakim. Pourvue d'une immense bibliothèque médicale.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #418

    V. DARWESH

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #129

    Titre existant avant l'introduction de Waras*.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Persian word darkhana, is composed of two syllables, dar and khana. The preposition dar means in, and khana means house. Thus, the darkhana means in the house. Any specific thing in the house is also called darkhana. Another view suggests that it is derived from darb-i khana means chief place of residence, or dari khana, a residence with big windows being used for the royal meetings. In Ismaili terminology, it represents specific abode of the Imam, or Imam's headquarters.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1021

    NaW DaRWAZA: les 9 portes (du corps humain).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #417

    Derviche. Titre persan qui devint Daraish puis Daras en Inde. Titre donné par l'Imam Abul Hassanali Shah â ceux du Jamat qui menaient une vie austère.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word darwish or darvesh (pl. darawish) is a Persian word, being composed of two syllables, dar and vish. Various meanings are assigned to the two syllables, taken together. Some say it means the sill of the door; others, those who beg from door to door; while there are many who assert that darwish signifies in thought or deep meditation, using the dar as a preposition in, and not as a substantive, and the vish as thought.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The culture of decima or tithe (old English teogothian) was common among the Babylon. The discovery of old clay tablets in 1966 however reveals that it was prevalent long before the civilization of the Babylon. Tithe or tenth part was a customary tax in ancient Egypt, Syria and Greece. Cyrus caused his soldiers to devote tenth of their booty to Zeus. Zoroaster imposed tithe on traders and market dealers for the welfare of the priests.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #31

    (Sanscr.). D

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #7

    (Persan: embrasser la main) liée â la cérémonie du Bayat*

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Persian word dastbos or dastbosi means the kissing of hands. It is an act of reverence. The Koran says, "Surely, those who swear allegiance to you do but swear allegiance to God, the hand of God is above their hand" (48:10). It clearly means that the hand of the Prophet was the hand of God. One can understand that the hand of the Prophet or the Imam is a blessed one for the believer, and kissing it is an act of reverence. The Koran says: "That you may believe in God and His apostle and may aid him and revere him" (48:9).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1016

    D

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1014

    Ma

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #33

    (Arabe) Appel, convocation. Désigne la propagation de la foi. Appel qui a commencé dans le plérôme céleste. Confrérie ismaélienne.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #507

    Contre, éloigné. V. Dourijan. (loin des yeux)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The period following the dawr-i satr (concealment period) is known as dawr-i kashf i.e., an unveiling period, which is also known as dawr-i zuhur (manifestation period) when the Imam publicly makes his appearance. The period between Imam Taqi Muhammad and Imam Razi Abdullah was the dawr-i satr, and then Imam al-Mahdi appeared in Maghrib publicly, making the period dawr-i zuhur.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word satr (pl. satur) is derived from astar, meaning hide, cover or shield. As it is said, masatra (he concealed enmity), or tastir (to hold within a curtain). According to Arabic-English Lexicon (New York, 1872, 4:1304) by Edward William Lane, the word satr means to veil, conceal or hide a thing.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #676

    Pitié. V. TCHAR MANEK.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #293

    Daint = demon, Kalingo = Kali, black. Damned Demon,represents the opposite of the Naklanki* Avtar.

    Dayt = démon, Kalingo = Kali = noir. Démon maudit. Opposant du Naklanki* Awatar.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
    Word Reference: 
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #510

    Montrer.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #511

    Vu, (du verbe voir, montrer) V. DEKHAR.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1015

    Le Daylam. g. 149:3 "Délam désh Hari awtariya..." (Mon Seigneur est venu du pays du Daylam..)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The generic term sharru or precentor in Assyria can be traced in the sha'ir or poet-soothsayer of the Arabs. The Assyrian hymn was the shire, and in it we recognize the Hebrew shir (song) and the Arabic shi'r (poetry). The Psalm of David in Assyrian was the zamaru, which equates with the Hebrew zimrah (song) and mizmor (psalm). Certainly the Assyrian shigu or penitential psalm is identical with the shiggaion of the Hebrew and the shajan of the Arabs in origin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #512

    Dieu, Divin, Céleste. Equiv. Allah*. cf. Sambhala Sanscrit - English Dictionary, p. 422.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #513

    Maison de Dieu, lieu de prière.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #515

    Richesse, possession. Ne pas confondre avec DAN=don et charité.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #884

    Néant, Chaos pré-éternel. "E wirabhay ek dhandoukar, fari douja howénga, bhay kyamat ké din menhji" (Pir Shams g. 29:1)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #516

    Néant, Chaos. Période avant la Création.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #517

    Avare.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #518

    Tronc (de l'arbre) ou corps (humain).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #519

    Religion. DIN*, v. DHaRaM DWAR*.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #514

    Lieu de religion. DEW DWAR*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #520

    Allaiter. "HaRNI DHaWRAWE BAL" (biche allaitant son enfant) g. 124

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word dhiram is derived from Greek drachme. It is a monetary unit. It is a silver coin, originally of 2.97 grams (or 50 grains of barley with cut ends), later of varying value. Ten dhirams equaled the value of one gold dinar.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #521

    L'attention.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #922

    Garder, donner.

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