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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word ma'ad is derived from the verb ada or awd signifies to return to a place, and thus ma'ad means the ultimate place of one's returning. It is also treated as a synonym of raja'a, which is also used in the Koran (2:28) to indicate return to God: "Then He will make you die, then He will make you live, then you will be brought back to Him (ilayhi turjaun)". Its verbal form ada denotes to recommence or reiterate.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word ma'sum is derived from the verb asama, means prevented, hindered, protected, defended, preserved, etc. Hence, ma'sum means one who is incapable of error and sin. In Islamic theology, the Arabic term isma both impeccability and closely related notion of infallibility, which is not an inherent quality, but rather a divine gift bestowed on the Prophets and Imams.

    See Immunity of Prophets and Immunity of Imams

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #663

    Mauvaises actions.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The name maghrib (the land of sunset) was given by the Arabs to that virgin part of Africa, which European have called Barbery or Africa Minor, (the French Afrique du Nord), and then North Africa. In north it is bordered by the Mediterranean, and in the south by the Sahara desert. In the west it is extended as far as the Atlantic Ocean, and in the east it extends as far as the borders of Egypt.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #903

    Puissant. Expression: mahabar JODA* (guerrier puissant), "MaN to mahabar Joda." (l'Ego est un guerrier puissant).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #664

    De MAHA = Grand et DIN = jour. Jour du Jugement. (Yauméddin)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #364

    Grand Seigneur. Maha = grand. Déw = Seigneur, ange, divinité.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #66

    Haut stade, haute sphère de méditation. V. Khat Darshan. g. 493, 30.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #67

    (Arabe:) Le Messie. Surnom de l'Imam qui ouvrira le cycle d'épiphanie.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #951

    V. KRaPA.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mahiz means menstruation or the menses, also called hayz – a monthly flow of blood from the uterus. The woman in this condition is called ha’iz or ha’izah. It is a natural monthly discharge of the lining of the uterus. The discharge consists of blood, degenerated cells of the lining, mucus and some bacteria. The menstruation flow normally lasts from four to six days with a variation of two to eight days. A period lasting more than eight days is abnormal. The amount of blood loss average 33 milliliters (ml) or about one ounce.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #307

    (443AH-509AHh). Pir in 487AH. Son of Pir Satgur Noor, born in Sabzwar. Had 6 sons. Also known as Mahmood Sabzwari. Killed in Lahore. Was also a companion of King Massud.

    (443AH-509AHh). Pir en 487AH, fils aîné de Pir Satgour Nour, né au Sabzwar. 6 fils. Connu sous le nom de Mahmood Sabzwari. Tué à Lahore.Compagnon du Roi Massood

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #665

    Palais.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Maimundiz was the famous Ismaili stronghold, located to the north of presently village of Shams Kilaya and westward from Alamut. Because of the great altitude, the cold was so extreme as to make it impossible for beasts to find a home or live in that location from the beginning of autumn until the middle of spring. According to Jamiut Tawarikh (p. 122), the construction of the fortress of Maimundiz began in 490/1097, but Kashani (d. 738/1338) determines in 497/1103 in his Zubdat al-Tawarikh (p. 144).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Abbasids took notice of the rapid conversion of the Ismailis in Khorasan, notably Nasr bin Ahmad, and insinuated Nuh bin Nasr (331-343/943-954), the son of Nasr bin Ahmad; against his father and the Ismailis. Nuh bin Nasr dethroned his father and conducted a barbarous massacre of the Ismailis in 331/942, known in the Ismaili history as al-mainat al-uzama (great calamity) in Khorasan and Transoxania. An-Nasafi and his chief associates were also executed in the wild operations at Bukhara in 332/943. For this reason, Nasir Khusaro called him Khwaj-i Shahid and Shaikh al-Shahid.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word maisir is derived from different roots, such as yasara means to become gentle, to draw lots by arrows, or yasar means affluence because gambling bring about profit, or yusr means convenience, because gambling is a means of earning without toil, or yasr means dividing a thing into a number of shares. Zamakhshari (d.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word majalis is derived from the verb jalasa, meaning to sit down or to hold a session, and majalis therefore means meeting or assembly. (Koran: 68:11-12)

    In pre-Islamic period, the majalis designated an assembly or council of the tribe's notables. In various states of the Middle Ages, an elaborate governmental structure contained a series of majalis, such as majalis al-baladiyya (municipal council), majalis al-wuzura (council of ministers), etc.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The chiragh-i rawshan is also solemnized for the longevity, prosperity and blessing of a person who is alive, known as dawat-i baqa. It also corresponds with the Indian tradition of the hayati majalis. It also exhorts that the Imam is an Everlasting Guide and Epiphany (mazhar) of God on earth. The believers must kindle the lamp of Divine Light in their hearts. Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah also said, "The lamp of the Divine Light exists in you and your hands. This is spoken metaphorically. This lamp always exists in you all" (Zanzibar, 13/9/1899).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It almost resembles the practice of the ruhani majalis prevalent in the Indian tradition. When one dies, his family members and relatives assemble in his house for three days, known as the dawat-i fana. His family does not cook food for three days, but only a lamp is kindled. Major J. Biddulph writes in Tribes of the Hindoo Koosh (Karachi, 1977, p. 123) that, "On the evening of the appointed day, a caliph comes to the house, and food is cooked and offered to him.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #666

    Maison, endroit.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The Arabic word for angel is malak (pl. mala'ika), which is derived from alk or alaka, meaning the bearing of messages. Another view traces its root from malk or milk, meaning power. It is also stated that it is derived from uluqatun, means messenger. In Arabic the person whom the message is assigned to convey is also called uluqat. The word malak and mala'ika occur 68 times in the Koran.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    A'FAQ Horizon

    A'MIR Civilized

    A'QIB Following

    A'ZAM Greatest

    ABBAS Gloomy

    ABDULLAH Servant of God

    ABID Devoted

    ABUZAR Father of Particle

    ADIB Scholar

    ADIL Just

    ADNAN N.Arabian

    AFROZ Dazzling

    AFTAB Sun

    AFZAL Best

    AHMAD Praiseworthy

    AKBAR Great

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #69

    Seigneur, Ma

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #667

    Soi, âme. MaNSOUDH*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #668

    Cercle, circonférence. Décrit les objets ronds, les galaxies, les trajectoires des comètes.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #688

    Lieu de prière, MINDaR*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #669

    Trésor, bijou. V. TCHAR MANEK*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #677

    Obéir.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #422

    Homme, être humain.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #678

    Viande.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #108

    King Mansudh - symbolizes the spirit. see ginaan. Prem Paatan. He helpedQueen Radeh.* to attained salvation.

    Raja Mansoudh = Roi Mansoudh/ Symbole de l'Esprit. v. Ginan PREM PATAN. Est dans chacun. Aide RANI Raday* à atteindre Dieu.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #70

    Verset abrogé. Par oppos. â Nasikh, verset abrogeant.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "He was born in 302/914 in Kairwan, the first Fatimid Imam to be born in Maghrib. His name was Ismail and kunya was Abu Tahir, surnamed al-Mansur bi-Amrillah (Victorious by the command of God). He acceded the throne on 334/945 during the time when Abu Yazid had laid a siege over Susa.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It simply means stage. The division of the Koranic suras on the basis of manzil is made to facilitate the reading of the entire Koran within a week. The manzil are seven in number as follows:-

    1. Sura Fatiha (1) to Sura Nisa (4)

    2. Sura Maida (5) to Sura Tauba (9)

    3. Sura Yunus (10) to Sura Nahl (16)

    4. Sura Bani Israel (17) to Sura Furqan (25)

    5. Sura Shora (26) to Sura Yasin (36)

    6. Sura Safaat (37) to Sura Hujurat (49), and

    7. Sura Ka'af (50) to Sura Naas (114).

    MARRIAGE [ see NIKAH ]

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #928

    Chemin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #489

    Essence de Vérité. V. Bhéd.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #679

    Poids équivalent â 40 SHER* c-â-d. 40 livres ou approx. 16 kg.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #72

    Connaissance, Gnose. Connaissance de l'Absolu. V. IB (Shariat*, Tariqat*, Haqiqat*, Marifat*)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #682

    A moi, le mien, mon. (possessif). "maroun maroun keri mari gayo".

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #681

    Décédé. "marna hé jarour..." (Il faudra bien mourir un jour...).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    It means what God does, is well done. It is usually uttered at the end of an act and reminds us that, ultimately, whatever comes from God, and that whatever is realized is not by human effort alone but through His Will.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Masiyaf is a town of central Syria on the eastern side of the Jabal al-Nusairia, situated at 33 miles to the east of Baniyas and 28 miles to the east of Hammah. The word masiyaf is derived from the second form verb sayyafa means to pass the summer. The pronunciation and orthography of the name varies between the form, Masyad, Masyaf, Mayat, Masyath, Masyab, Masyah and Messiat. The stronghold of Masiyaf lies to the northeast of the settlement, at the foot of the Jabal al-Bahra. It was an Arab citadel, perched on a rocky limestone block.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word masjid is derived from sajd (prostration), thus it means the place of prostration. The English word mosque derives via French mosquee, the old French mousquaie, the old Italian moschea and moscheta, while moschee in German and mescit in Turkish - all came from the Arabic via Spanish mezquita. In East Africa, the mosque is commonly spoken of in Swahili as msikiti (pl. misikiti). In Indonesia, it is pronounced as mesigit, masigit and maseghit.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The status of women in Islam, especially with regards to such issues as marriage, inheritance, veiling and seclusion has received a great deal of scholarly attention. For women, the mosque meant access to almost every aspect of public life. Debarring or limiting their access means restricting their participation in public life. Gender segregation, as seen in most mosques today, is such a limitation, for it limits women's full access. This both hampers their participation and can even shut them out completely.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The temple of Jerusalem is honoured in the Koran (17:1) as al-majid al-Aqsa (lit. the remote mosque). The sacredness of Jerusalem is emphasized on numerous places. Abraham migrated to the land of Canaanite around 1805 BC. The Koran states: "And We made them the greater losers. But We delivered him and (his nephew) Lot (and directed them) to the land which We have blessed for the nations" (21: 69-71). The Koran reports Moses telling his people: "O my people!

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Kaba stands in the center of a parallelogram whose dimensions are as follows: North-west side 545 feet, south-east side 553 feet, north-east side 360 feet and south-west side 364 feet. This are is known as al-Masjid al-Haram, or the Sacred Mosque, the famous mosque in Mecca. In the Koran this name occurs in revelations of the early Meccan period, as in 17:1. The area of the Sacred Mosque contains, besides the Kaba, the Maqam Ibrahim and the Zamzam buildings. The term Baitullah (House of God) is applied to the whole enclosure, although it more specially denotes the Kaba itself.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    MASJID-I NABWI [ see MASJID ]

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #308

    King of Ghazna. Pir Mahmood Shah was his companion and he was killed while accompanyingthe king to Lahore.

    Roi de Ghazna. Pir Mahmood Shah était son compagnon et fut tué en l'accompagnant à Lahore.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #73

    Immaculé, préservé, immunisé de toute souillure.

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