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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    (la'n or la'nah means cursing, normally consists of an expression of disapproval or displeasure and an invocation of malediction upon the object of the curse. Curses are often uttered by calling the curse and wrath of God upon someone, or by an invocation in the passive voice where the agent is not always specified, for example: may God's curse be upon him; may he be cursed. Curses are often expressed by verbs with an optative sense, with "to curse, damn" (la'ana) appearing most frequently in the Koran.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #646

    Est venu.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Shamsul Mulk, the daughter of Mirza Ali Muhammad Nizam ad-Dawla, the grandson of Muhammad Hussain Khan Ispahani, the Prime Minister of Shah Fateh Ali Qajar (d. 1250/1834) of Iran; was born in Ispahan. Khurshid Kulah, the mother of Shamsul Mulk was the daughter of Shah Fateh Ali through one of his queens, Tajudawla Ispahani by name. Lady Aly Shah was thus related to the Iranian royal family through her mother.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #647

    Brise, odeur, enthousiasme.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #64

    Divinité.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The battle of Siffin between Ali bin Abu Talib and Muawiya broke out on 8th Safar, 36/July 26, 657. A fierce battle was fought between them on the whole day, and it even continued in the darkness of that night, which is known as lail at-harir (the night of clangour). William Muir writes in The Caliphate, its Rise and Fall (London, 1924, p. 261) that, "Both armies drawn out in entire array, fought till the shades of evening fell, neither having got the better. The following morning, the combat was renewed with great vigour.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    One of the last ten nights of the month of Ramzan is called lail at-Qadr. The word lail or laila means night and qadr means originally measuring. Thus, lail at-qadr is translated as meaning the night of grandeur or night of majesty. In the Koran, it is spoken of in two places. In chapter 97, it is mentioned thrice as lail at-qadr: “Surely, We revealed it on lail at-qadr. And what will make thee comprehend what lail at-qadr is?

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word hilal means slim crescent, while the word badr means full moon. The word appears only once in its plural form, ahilla in the Koran (2:189). The general term in the Koran for moon however occurs 27 times, usually paired with the sun. The Hebrew word hodesh also means new moon. The term lail at-qamar means the night of the crescent. The method of calculation of the new moon was firstly introduced by the Fatimids in 331/942 in North Africa, then in 359/970 at Cairo.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #648

    Honneur, honte. (V. prière de Tara Rani)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #649

    Cent mille (100 000).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #650

    84 lakh = 8 400 000. Se réfère aux incarnations de l'âme avant d'atteindre le salut. (Moksh, mougat, didar). Coran XXXIX:42, II:28, Bahré Rahémat p. 145

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #651

    V. MOUKHTI. g. 378, Farman Wadwan Camp 18 oct. 1903

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "In 489/1095, Hasan bin Sabbah had sent Kiya Buzrug Ummid with a troop to conquer the fortress of Lamasar in 489/1095. He defeated a certain Rasmasuj and took possession of Lamasar, also known as Rudhbar-i Alamut. According to Jamiut Tawarikh (pp. 27-8), "The fort of Lamasar was situated on a rotten hill, with a few decayed houses on it, with no vegetation nearby. The climate of the place was very hot.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #51

    Sens occulte, relatif au monde supra sensible. Appartient aux Awliya.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word lauh means plank, as in Koran (54:13), and also a tablet for writing, and mahfuz means that which is guarded. The expression lauh mahfuz (guarded tablet) occurs but once in the Koran: "Nay, it is a glorious Koran in a guarded tablet" (85:21-22). The word lauh in its plural form alwah is used in connection with the books of Moses: "And We ordained for him in the tablets (alwah) admonition of every kind and clear explanation of all things" (7:145).

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #65

    Night of Power/Destiny. 23rd day of the month of Ramdhan. Night when the Prophet received the first revelation of the Quran. XCVII/1-5. Also symbolizes the night of humanity in this period of occultation.

    Nuit du Destin. 23e. jour du Ramadhan. Nuit de la 1ere révélation. Coran XCVII/1-5. Symbolise la nuit de l'humanité en ce cycle d'occultation.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Examining a critical and analytical approach of the sources, it is almost possible to clarify that the fortress of Alamut was situated in rocky and infertile region, and its physical condition during occupation was very much rough and coarse. It was embosomed with swamps and muddy tracts, accounting unhealthy atmosphere. Hasan bin Sabbah immediately embarked on the task of renovating the castle, which was in great need of repairs, improving its fortifications, storage facilities and water supply sources.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #652

    Comptes, l'actif, ce qui est écrit, le destin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #653

    Prendre avec.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Life (hay) in the sense of living out one's corporeal existence is, however, paradoxically fraught with danger, illusion and deception. The Koran exhibits an almost platonic rejection of the life of this world (al-hayat al-dunya), characterizing it as nothing but "play and amusement (la'ib wa-lahw) and contrasting it with the reward of the righteous in the hereafter (6:32).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #654

    Prononcer, prendre. "outhta besta sahebji ko nam lijé.." (Se levant, s'asseyant, il faut prononcer en tout temps le Nom de Seigneur).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #655

    Monde ou endroit. TRILOK*, TCHAOUD LOK*

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #986

    Yeux, vue. Titre respectueux. (Tara Rani Lotchana)

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