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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED) carries out the Network's economic development activities. It consists of three groups of companies, especially active in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia: Industrial Promotion Services (IPS), Tourism Promotion Services (TPS) and Financial Services Companies.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word eid is derived from aud meaning to return. In Islam, it means a recurring happiness. The word adha, the plural of adhat means a sacrifice. On this occasion, all the Muslims who can afford, sacrifice an animal. In the case of a goat or a sheep, one animal is suffices for one household. In the case of a cow or a camel, seven men may be partners. It may be sacrificed on the day of Eid or during the two or three days that follows, called the tashriq days.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word fitr means to begin, from which is also derived fitra meaning nature. The word iftar means the breaking of the fast, as if the faster had returned to a natural course or fulfilled the demand of nature, and it is from this that the name Eid al-Fitr seems to have been taken. "The feast that marks the end of Ramzan is a day when no fasting is allowed at all" (al-Muslim, 2:553), and it is customary for families to dress well in that day and visit each other and offer greetings.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    According to the Shi'ite belief, at the spring (khum) of al-Ghadir, the Prophet as his successor declared Ali bin Abu Talib and the festival commemorated this occasion. The fusion of religion which was characteristic of all religious festivals in Fatimid Egypt, is best exemplified by the festival of Eid al-Ghadir.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The month of Rabi I has an immortal significance in the whole of human history. In this month that Blessed Being made his auspicious appearance from the person of Amina who diverted totally the very stream of the human history; who uplifted humanity from the lowest pit of degradation and rose it to the zenith of glory and grandeur; who heralded a new message of peace and prosperity for the suffering mankind. He emancipated the human race from those fetters in which it had been lying shackled for centuries. He relieved humanity of those heavy burdens under which it had been groaning for ages.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #541

    Un.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #542

    A un. "ékakoun radaj kida..." (anéanti l'un d'eux), g. "Allah ek khassam"

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #1017

    Paix, calme, silence. V. AtH JIW. Syn: SHANTI

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #899

    Soixante-onze (71). "ékotér pouriya jiwna odhariya" (sauva 71 générations) g. 397

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #543

    Une fois. (War = fois).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #958

    Vingt et un. EKWIS DaRWAJA (21 portes). "TEM SAT PaHOR LAGI, EKWIS DaRWAJA DaR NISaRIYA..." g. 696:173

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #545

    21,600 Ekwis hajar chaso. Nombre de respirations journalières de l'homme. g. 489, Brunton "L'Inde secrète", Shaygan "Hindouisme et Soufisme".

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #546

    1. Connaissance, 2. Monde, 3. Livres Saints.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #997

    Also known as Lady Ema or Emra. ___149:4. Historical figure, referred to as a saint in the ginan "Satiye toriya motira no har." She was a gupti who practised Taqiya* and left this world in a Wiman [flying saucer].

    Dame Ema ou Emra. g. 149:4 Personnage historique. Sainte référée comme Sati dans g. "satiyé toriya motira no har". Gupti pratiquant le Taqiya*, quitta ce monde en Wiman*.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #547

    Pour l'Amour de Dieu, par la Grâce de Dieu. g. 348

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #548

    Partit en pure perte, perdu, inutile. NUM: 38 MOT: FATIHA CD: M DEF: Sourat d'ouverture du Coran. Equiv. récitation de tout le Coran. Prière récité lors d'un décès. V. Ummul Kitab*

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The key verbal roots occur more than two dozen times each in the Koran with –k-l and sh-r-b appears together eight times. The most famous occurrence is in 7:31, where God says the children of Adam to dress properly when attending the mosque, and to “eat and drink, but avoid excess for He does not love the intemperate,” and “Eat of what your Lord has given you (kulu min rizqi rabbikum) and render thanks to Him” (34:15).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    No limitations are placed upon the form or quality of clothing, either in the Koran or hadith. The Prophet is reported to have said, "Eat and drink and wear clothes and be charitable, not being extravagant or self-conceited" (Bukhari, 77:1). Ibn Abbas said: "Eat what you like and wear what you like, so long as you avoid two things, extravagance and vanity" (Ibid.) Thus, Islam requires no particular dress. A man may choose what he eats and what he wears. The only thing required is that the clothes should be clean and good (Abu Daud., 31:13)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The name of God should be uttered before drinking; and the Lord should be praised at the end (Daim al-Islam, p. 447). Imam Jafar Sadik used to drink standing as well as sitting (Ibid., p. 449). Ali bin Abu Talib drank water while standing, and added that people did not like it but he had seen the Prophet drinking water while standing (Bukhari, 74:15).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The host should offer water to wash the hands of his guests from the right to the left, washing his own last. When a man has guests with him, he should eat joyfully with them; he should be the last to begin to eat, and he should be the last to lave his hands before, and last to do so after, a meal (Kitab Majmu'at al-Hawashi, p. 59). When the host's relation are present at a meal, the host should wash his hands last, apart from the members of his own family (Daim al-Islam, p. 414)

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah had called a Conference in Evian, France known as the Evian Conference between July 4, 1952 and July 8, 1952 to discuss various economic and social problems confronting the African Ismailis and also to make necessary amendments in the Constitution of the African Councils.

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