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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Tradition has it that Imam Muhammad bin Ismail left Medina and went to southern Iraq, where he acquired the epithet of al-maktum (veiled one), and then at Nishapur in disguise, where he lodged for some times. Afterwards, the Imam proceeded towards Ray, about 15 miles from Tehran. Ishaq bin al-Abbas al-Farsi, the Abbasid governor of Ray professed Ismailism. Imam betrothed to Fatima, the daughter of Sarah, sister of Ishaq bin al-Abbas.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Ismailis of Malaysia emigrated from India in 1920 under the guidance of Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah and were settled in Federation of Malaya and State of Singapore, the country now is known as Malaysia. The Ismailis in Malaysia have good and cordial relations with other communities like the Malays, the Chinese, the Indians and the Europeans. There are about 500 Ismailis spread over in cities and towns like Singapore, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Seramban, Kotra Bahru and Kuala Trenganu.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The extant records reveal that a handful Ismailis of Bombay slowly moved towards Colombo, in which Wazir Saboor Chatoor (1899-1967) was a prominent figure. He came in Colombo in 1915, and started his labour work in a shop. Later, he ventured into the business field and helped the Indian Ismailis in their settlement in Colombo. He parted a big portion of his residence for the Jamatkhana in 1933. Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah came in Colombo on March 20, 1934 and appointed him the Mukhi with Ibrahim Ismail Virji Madhani as the Kamadia.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Ismailis slowly came to settle in Geneva, where they built the first Jamatkhana on March 21, 1966. The Imam sent following message to Mukhiani Mrs. Gulshan F. Hajee for the jamat:

    2nd March, 1966

    My dear Mukhiani,

    I have received your letter of 28th February, and I send you and all beloved spiritual children of Swiss jamat my best paternal maternal loving blessings.

    I was happy to know that you are decorating a new place for Jamatkhana at 22, Pierrefleur Lausanne, and you may certainly inaugurate it on the occasion of Navroz.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Syria is an original homeland of the Ismailis. It is located at the eastern end of the Mediterranean sea. Iraq bound it on the east on the north by Turkey, on the west by Lebanon and the Mediterranean sea and on the south by Jordan and Israel. The Ismailis mostly flourished in Salamia, where Imam Ismail resided secretly till death in 158/775. Imam Muhammad bin Ismail also came to live in Salamia, where he died in 197/813. The Abbasids intensified operations in search of the Imam, thus Imam Wafi Ahmad went to Syria and lived in the castle of Masiyaf for some time.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The small group of the Ismaili students started a small Jamatkhana in London in 1935. The number of the Jamatkhana also increased rapidly after 1972. In 1984, there were over 70 Jamatkhana in United Kingdom. Thus, the first Darkhana Jamatkhana opened in London on April 10, 1984. In 1951, a religious, cultural and social center was established by the Ismaili jamat at Kensington Court, and in 1957 was moved to Palace Gate in the Borough of Kensington.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The first Jamatkhana in United States was opened on December 13, 1967 at Chicago. The Imam had sent the following message on February 8, 1967:-

    "I have received your letter of 20th January, and I give my best paternal maternal loving blessings to all beloved spiritual children mentioned in your letter for their devoted services on the occasion of the Majlas held on my birthday.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Imam Radi Abdullah had dispatched his da'is in all directions, the most acclaimed among them was Ibn Hawshab. When the Imam found that Ibn Hawshab was groomed enough for the responsibility of its promulgation, he jointly entrusted him and his colleague, Ibn Fazal, with the task of Ismaili mission in Yamen. They conquered Sana'a, the capital of Yamen, and exiled the ruling tribe of Banu Laydir, and established Ismaili authority in Yamen. The Ismaili mission reached the apex of its influence in Yamen, from where Ibn Hawshab dispatched many da'is to the farthest corners.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word isqat means abortion. Classical Muslim jurists applied a number of terms to abortion, including isqat, ijhadIt, tarh, ilqa and imlas. The Koran does not make reference to abortion as the term is commonly understood, although it upholds the sanctity of human life in general (5:32) and forbid the killing of children (17:31) and female infants (81:18-9) in particular.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #270

    (10C.) Author of "Al-Kitab al Muizzi", a culinary art book dedicated to Imam al-Muizz.

    (10e S.) Auteur du "al-kitab al-Mu'izzi", un livre d'art culinaire dédié à l'Imam al-Mu'izz.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The verb istakhbara is used forty times in the Koran and its participle, mustakbir, six times. Pride (takabbur) is very often denounced by the Koran as a sin, because of its similarity to a form of partnership with God. Pride is the sin of all those who refuse to surrender to God. It was also Satan's first sin (2:34, 38:73-4).

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #586

    Désir, souhait.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The death of Imam Jafar Sadik in 148/765 marked the beginning of the decentralization of Shi'ite religious authority. The Ithna Asharites or the Twelvers, the Shi'ite sect supported Musa Kazim as their next Imam after Imam Jafar Sadik. Musa Kazim was born in 128/745 on the road between Mecca and Medina. His mother was a Berbar slave, called Hamida. Throughout the whole of his life, Musa was faced with hostility from the Abbasids. The cause of his arrest and murder is said to have been the result of the plotting of caliph Harun ar-Rashid's vizir, Yahya bin Khalid.

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