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Dictionary and Encyclopedia of ismailism entries

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Topic ContainsTopic TypeEnglish Def Contains:
  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #693

    Salut de l'âme. V. MOUKHTI.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #78

    Croyant, fidèle. KIM I/48-55. Il y a toujours 313 momins au monde. V. Murid.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #80

    Projet Divin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #694

    Refusable, renvoyable, inutile.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #695

    De MOTI = perles. Forme poétique.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #696

    Refuser.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #984

    g. 172, 281:2, 125:13, 304:3

    g. 172, 281:2, 125:13, 304:3

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #697

    Le fidèle. (de MOUNI*)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #79

    V. momin.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #970

    BE MOUSAFaR: 2 voyageurs. Il s'agit de Sourbhanr et Tchandrabhanr. g. 151

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #983

    Voyageur. Jodilo 13 Pir Shams.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #698

    Idolatre. "Mousrak man to kafar kahiyén".

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #81

    (Notre) Seigneur. V. Qiyamat al-Qiyamat. ("Mowlana est le Seigneur des êtres...)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #660

    Terre. V. TRILOK.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Arabic word mu’min (pl. mu’minun) is the active participle of form 4th of the root –m-n means to believe. The word mu’min thus means believer or faithful. In order to qualify as a mu’min, one must believe in the Unity of God, the finality of the Prophet, belief in God’s earliest prophets, His revealed books, His angels and the hereafter. In Koran, the attitude of true believers towards God is characterized by gratitude, awe, repentance and submission.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Al-Muayyad fid-din ash-Shirazi was born in 390/1000 in Shiraz. He was an outstanding da'i, orator, prolific writer, poet and politician. His father, tracing his link from a Daylami Ismaili family was also a da'i with some influence in the Buwahid orbits of Fars. In one of poems he narrates in his Diwan al-Muayyad (poem no. 4) that, "I wish I should get a chance to offer my life as a sacrifice for you, O my Lord.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Mubarak or mabruk is derived from baraka (to bless). It means be blessed or good luck. It is a customary wish extended on special occasions.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word muhajir (pl. muhajirin) means the emigrant, one who flies or forsake his home, is the name often applied in the Koran to those followers of the Prophet, who had migrated from Mecca to Medina with him. The word is derived from hijra. The term muhajir is not applied to the Prophet himself, but only to those who migrated with, before or after him and later made up a large portion of the population of Medina.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #322

    (10th Century) Author of geographic literature of Imam al-Aziz.

    (10e S). Auteur d'un ouvrage géographique pour l'Imam al-Aziz.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Abu Jafar Muhammad bin Ali, known as al-Bakir was born on 1st Rajab, 57/October 15, 677. He assumed Imamate at the age of 37 years. He possessed extensive knowledge in religion matters, and because of that, according to Yaqubi, he was nicknamed al-Bakir (split open, or revealer of secret science), as it is said, tabaqqara al-rajulu fi'l aw fi'l mal means the man became abundant in knowledge or he enhanced himself in knowledge. But according to Ibn Khallikan, he was so called because he collected an ample treasure or fund (tabaqqar) of knowledge.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi was born on Monday, the 12th Shawal, 260/July 31, 873 in the town, called Askar-i Mukram (or Askar wa Makrum), situated between the rivers of Masrukan and Shushtar. His name was Abdullah al-Mahdi and assumed the Imamate at the age of 8 years. His father, Imam Radi Abdullah had assigned the control of organization to his uncle, Sa'id al-Khayr. By the time Imam al-Mahdi became young, and married a daughter of his uncle, who died after some time.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Imam Muhammad bin Islam Shah, also known as Muhammad or Mehmud Shah, was probably born in Daylam. He was ten years old when his father arrived in Kahek in 798/1396. If this is a genuine tradition, it implies that he was born possibly in 788/1386, and was about 17 years old while assuming the Imamate. He mostly resided in Shahr-i Babak in Kirman. Imam Muhammad bin Islam Shah seems to have started communications from his headquarters to different Ismaili communities, and also accepted the gifts of the pilgrims.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Abu Abdullah Muhammad, surnamed ash-Shakir was born in 122/740 in Medina. He passed his early life with his grandfather for 24 years and 10 years with his family in Medina. He however kept himself silent so long as he lived in Medina. He most probably left Medina soon after the death of his grandfather in 148/765.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Muhammad bin Kiya Buzrug was born in 490/1097 probably in the fortress of Lamasar. He was given training by his father, and proved an able and competent administrator. He was assisted by his one young brother Kiya Ali, who led many expeditions and died in 538/1144. In the early part of Muhammad bin Kiya's reign, the area in control of Alamut was extended in Daylam and Gilan, where several new castles were taken or constructed, such as Sa'adatkuh, Mubarakkuh and Firuzkuh.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    In India, Syed Ghulam Ali Shah was collecting the religious dues in Kutchh, and after his death in 1797, the Imam Shah Khalilullah Ali, who ascended on May 23, 1792 had appointed him as a vakil in Gujrat. He mostly preached in north Gujrat among the Momina Ismailis. He led a pious life in the dress of a rich person. When he passed through any village, he had lot of horses and camels in his caravan. He also visited Sind, Kutchh and Kathiawar and composed few ginans. The accumulated funds he collected in these regions were remitted to the Imam lastly in 1807.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #323

    (15/16e S) son of Sayyed Imam Shah. Married the daughter of Prince Muhammed Beggro.

    (15/16e S). fils de Seyyed Imam Shah. Epousa la fille du Prince Muhammad Bagro.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Ismael, the son of Abraham had a son, Kaidar whose progeny spread over the Arabian province of Hijaz. Adnan, to whom the Prophet traced his descent, was also a scion of Ismael in about the fortieth generations. Further down, in the ninth descent from Adnan, there followed Nadar bin Kinana. Another descent in the genealogical scale and then comes in the ninth place, one, Qassi by name. The supreme charge of the Kaba fell into the hands of Qassi (d. 480 A.D.).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The name Muhammad (may peace be upon him) is the passive participle of the second form of the verb hamada (to praise or laud), and means "(he who is) worthy of praise" or "(one who is) often praised." Muhammad is the passive participle of the first form of the same verbal root, "(he who is) praised, to whom praised is due."

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The verses of the Koran are stated to be partly muhkam (decisive) and partly mutabshabih (allegorical). The Koran (11:1) explains the first designation by declaring that it is "a book whose verses are precisely, clearly or unambiguously set forth" (uhkimat). Here the purpose of muhkam is to provide clear guidance. With regard to the second designation, the Koran (39:23) says: "God has sent down the best speech, a mutashabih book (kitaban mutashabihan)".

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "His name was Ma'd, and kunya was Abu Tamim, surnamed al-Muizz li-din'allah (Fortifier of the religion of God). He was born in Mahdiya in 319/931, and ascended in 341/952. His period is noted for the extension of the Fatimid domination from Maghrib to Egypt and Syria. His Caliphate is also acclaimed for the progress of learning and arts. He himself was a learned philosopher, scientist and astronomist.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The word mujizah is derived from ijaz meaning inability, referring to the miracle. The Koran exhorts miracles in a threefold sense: the sacred history, in connection with the Prophet, and in relation to revelation. The threefold sense of the miracle corresponds to the three meanings of the word aya (pl. ayat), which indicates the verse of the Koran as well as the miracle of it and the sign, particularly those of creation. The term aya is often followed or replaced by its nominalized qualifier, bayyina (pl.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Every mosque has a mutawalli (guardian), who is charged with its management and internal affairs. He has the right to appoint the man who leads the prayers. In the Ismaili tariqah, the guardian of each Jamatkhana is called mukhi, a word derived from mukhiya means foremost. Since the Imam physically is not present all the times in the Jamatkhana, the Mukhi acts tangible symbol of the Imam's authority. In the big jamat, the Mukhi was assisted by a caretaker called tha'nak.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #166

    A Kharijit who assassinated H. Ali in a mosque at Kufa in 661 A.H.Hazrat Ali had fought against the Kharijites during the battle of Naherwan.

    Kharéjite qui assassina H. Ali qui s'était battu contre les Kharejites lors de la bataille de Naherwan. Assassina H. Ali dans une mosquée en 661 à Kufa.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Hypocrite is the word generally used to translate the Koranic term munafiqun, the active participle of the third form of the root n-f-q. Its verbal noun, nifaq is usually translated as hypocrisy. The etymology of nifaq and munafiqun is disputed, but they are often associated with the nouns nafaq means tunnel, and nufaqa and nafiqa i.e. the burrow of a rat or a jerboa. The connotation of hiding underground and undermining is very apt, since this is precisely what the munafiqun are accused of.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The Arabic word munajat is derived from najiy, meaning confidential talk The Koran says: "And We called to him from the right side of the Mount (Sinai) and let him come near in order to have a personal talk (najiy) with Him" (19:52)

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #82

    Boucles d'oreilles, ornement. g. 575 et g. Abdou Khamiya dayaki mudra pahéro

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Ali Shah, surnamed Shah Murad or Murad Mirza lived in Anjudan. He had also retained his close relations with Shah Ismail cemented by his father. His mode of living, his dress and food were characterized by a rare simplicity.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #160

    (10th Century) Was Imam al Muiz's doctor. He received a substantial financial grant as did 2 of his sons who also became doctors.

    (10e S.) Médecin de l'Imam al-Muiz. Re

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The term mushrik is derived from shirk, i.e., associating in the sense of ascribing partners to God, which is described in the Koran as the only sin for which no forgiveness is possible (4:48). Another common Koranic expression for this is "those who associate" (alladhina ashraku).

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    One of the most perplexing points in Islam is its attitude towards music, and for centuries the legists have argued the question whether listening to music (al-sama) is lawful or not. It is not easy to comprehend how the question arose, seeing that there is not a word of direct censure against music in the Koran, and above all, in face of the fact that music was almost an indispensable article in the social life of the Arabs. According to A History of Arabian Music (London, 1929, p.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #324

    (7th Century) Imam Al-Hussein's cousin, was sent to Kufa as scout before the battle of Kerbala.(680) He was assassinated by the orders from the Ommyad, Yazid.

    (7e S.) Cousin de l'Imam al-Husseyn, fut envoyé en éclaireur à Kufa avant la bataille de Kerbala (680). Assassiné sous les ordre de l'Ommeyade Yazid.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    The term historiography means writing of history or written history. J. Sanford firstly coined this term in 1597, resembling the Arabic word ilm al-tarikh. The Koranic phrases asatir al-awwalin (writing of the ancient) also gives notion of historiography, vide 6:25, 8:31, 16:24-26, 23:83-85, 25:5-6, 27:68-70, 46:17, 68:15, 83:13, etc.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    Bernard Lewis writes in Historians of the Middle East (London, 1963, p. 3) that, "The first lesson of history

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Badr al-Jamali, the Fatimid vizir expected the succession of Musta'li but he died in 487/1095, a month before the death of Imam al-Mustansir. The Imam appointed Lawun Amin ad-Dawla as a new vizir, but after few days, al-Afdal, the son of Badr al-Jamali managed to obtain office of vizirate when the Imam was on death-bed. After the death of Imam al-Mustansir, the year 487/1095 marks the triumph of vizirial prerogative over caliphal authority in the structure of the Fatimid empire. Al-Afdal however, was fearing of being deposed by Imam al-Nizar, so he conspired to remove him.

  • Name
    Heritage Dictionary of ismailism, entry #199

    Son of Sayyed Didarali. d. around 1967 at the age of 98 years. Propogated Ismaili dawa in India.

    Fils de Seyyed Didarali. M. vers 1967 à l'âge de 98 ans. Dawa en Inde.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #238

    Permanent, opp. MUSTAWDA*.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "He was born in Cairo on 16th Jamada II, 420/July 2, 1029, who eight months afterwards was declared to succeed his father. His name was Ma'd Abu Tamim, surnamed al-Mustansir billah (Imploring the help of God). He ascended on 15th Shaban, 427/June 13, 1036 at the age of 7 years. During the early years, the state affairs were administered by his mother. His period of Caliphate lasted for 60 years, the longest of all the caliphs, either in Egypt or elsewhere in Islamic states.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "Ali Shah, surnamed Mustansir billah, also known as Jalaluddin was born in Kahek. He seems to have known as Shah Qalandar among the Iranian mystics. He too resided in Kahek and sometimes in Shahr-i Babak.

  • Noun
    Heritage Dictionary of Ismailism, entry #237

    Temporaire, fiduciaire. Imam Mustawda = Pir* et Hujjat*. (ex. Imam Hassan = Imam Mustawda). Opp. Mustakar = Permanent.

  • Encyclopedia Topic
    Encyclopaedia of Ismailism by Mumtaz Ali Tajddin

    "The word muta is derived from mata, meaning merchandise or goods. In case of a marriage it means "that which gives benefits, but for a short while" or enjoyment or pleasure. In Iran, this practice is called sigha (lit. form or type) and it is sometimes called nikah al-muwaqqat or izdivaj-i muvaqqat, both mean temporary marriage.

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